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I have two data frames. The first looks like this:

value <- seq(1, 100, length.out=20)
df1 <- data.frame(id=as.character(1:20), 
                  value=value, 
                  stringsAsFactors=F)

I have a second dataframe that looks like this

df2 <- data.frame(id=as.character(c(1:5, 21:23)),
                  v2=NA, 
                  stringsAsFactors=F)

I need the values transferring from df1 to df2, but only where df1$id == df2$id. So the dataframe I need is:

df2Needed <- data.frame(id=as.character(c(1:5, 21:23)),
                      v2=c(value[1:5], NA, NA, NA),
                      stringsAsFactors=F)

Is there a way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
Did you check ?merge ? –  Theodore Lytras Mar 9 '13 at 11:30
    
why do you make id as character? It'll sort the names by character which means 21 will come after 2. –  Arun Mar 9 '13 at 11:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using data.table:

require(data.table)
dt1 <- data.table(df1, key="id")
dt2 <- data.table(df2)

dt1[dt2$id, value]

#    id     value
# 1:  1  1.000000
# 2:  2  6.210526
# 3:  3 11.421053
# 4:  4 16.631579
# 5:  5 21.842105
# 6: 21        NA
# 7: 22        NA
# 8: 23        NA

or using base merge as @TheodoreLytras mentioned under comment:

# you don't need to have `v2` column in df2
merge(df2, df1, by="id", all.x=T, sort=F)

#   id v2     value
# 1  1 NA  1.000000
# 2  2 NA  6.210526
# 3  3 NA 11.421053
# 4  4 NA 16.631579
# 5  5 NA 21.842105
# 6 21 NA        NA
# 7 22 NA        NA
# 8 23 NA        NA
share|improve this answer
    
many thanks all for excellent help, data.table did the job nicely. Seems like this package well worth exploring! –  luciano Mar 9 '13 at 13:59
    
@RossAhmed, I think, this data.table solution (as agstudy shows), is not the most efficient implementation. I'll post a better one in a while. Please check back. I think match is much more nicer/simpler/faster for your problem though. You should consider looking at Theodore's answer. –  Arun Mar 9 '13 at 14:12
1  
@Arun as.data.table is faster than data.table. But normally we only convert once as even as.data.table copies the whole object. Class can be charged by reference without a copy using setattr if needed. –  Matt Dowle Mar 9 '13 at 23:26

Using LEFT join sql with sqldf

library(sqldf)
sqldf('SELECT df2.id , df1.value
      FROM df2
      LEFT JOIN df1
      ON df2.id = df1.id')

 id     value
1  1  1.000000
2  2  6.210526
3  3 11.421053
4  4 16.631579
5  5 21.842105
6 21        NA
7 22        NA
8 23        NA

EDIT add some benchamrking:

The match as expected is very fast here. sqldf is really slow!

Test on the OP data

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(ag(),ar.dt(),ar.me(),tl())

Unit: microseconds
     expr       min         lq     median        uq       max
1    ag() 23071.953 23536.1680 24053.8590 26889.023 34256.354
2 ar.dt()  3123.972  3284.5890  3348.1155  3523.333  7740.335
3 ar.me()   950.807  1015.2815  1095.1160  1128.112  6330.243
4    tl()    41.340    45.8915    68.0785    71.112   187.735

Test with big data 1E6 rows of data.

here how I generate my data:

N <- 1e6
df1 <- data.frame(id=as.character(1:N), 
                  value=seq(1, 100), 
                  stringsAsFactors=F)
n2 <- 1000
df2 <- data.frame(id=sample(df1$id,n2),
                  v2=NA, 
                  stringsAsFactors=F)

Surprise !! merge is 16 times faster than sqldf and data.table solution is the slowest one!

Unit: milliseconds
     expr       min        lq    median        uq        max
1    ag() 5678.0580 5865.3063 6034.9151 6214.3664  8084.6294
2 ar.dt() 8373.6083 8612.9496 8867.6164 9104.7913 10423.5247
3 ar.me()  387.4665  451.0071  506.8269  648.3958  1014.3099
4    tl()  174.0375  186.8335  214.0468  252.9383   667.6246

Where the function ag, ar.dt,ar.me, tl are defined by :

ag <- function(){
require(sqldf)
sqldf('SELECT df2.id , df1.value
      FROM df2
      LEFT JOIN df1
      ON df2.id = df1.id')
}


ar.dt <- function(){
  require(data.table)
  dt1 <- data.table(df1, key="id")
  dt2 <- data.table(df2)
  dt1[dt2$id, value]
}

ar.me  <- function(){
 merge(df2, df1, by="id", all.x=T, sort=F)
}

tl <- function(){
  df2Needed <- df2
 df2Needed$v2 <- df1$value[match(df2$id, df1$id)]
}

EDIT 2

It seems that including the data.table creation in the benchmarking it a little bit unfair. To avoid any confusion , I add a new function where I suppose that I have already data.table structures.

ar.dtLight <- function(){
  dt1[dt2$id, value]
}

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(ag(),ar.dt(),ar.me(),tl(),ar.dtLight,times=1)

Unit: microseconds
        expr         min          lq      median          uq         max
1       ag() 7247593.591 7247593.591 7247593.591 7247593.591 7247593.591
2    ar.dt() 8543556.967 8543556.967 8543556.967 8543556.967 8543556.967
3 ar.dtLight       1.139       1.139       1.139       1.139       1.139
4    ar.me()  462235.106  462235.106  462235.106  462235.106  462235.106
5       tl()  201988.996  201988.996  201988.996  201988.996  201988.996

It seems that the creation of the keys (indexes) is the time consuming. But once the indexes are created data.table method is unbeatable.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not quite sure if dt1 and dt2 creation should be included in the benchmark. –  Arun Mar 9 '13 at 13:39
    
@Arun I assumed that data.table creation is fast. The Op gives a data.frame as input, so the coercion to a data.table is part of the solution. –  agstudy Mar 9 '13 at 13:43
    
Most interesting benchmarks! –  Theodore Lytras Mar 9 '13 at 13:57
1  
@agstudy, pretty much. setting key to key by 1 column doesn't give much performance difference. Imagine if you were to key by 3 or 4 columns (subsetting) and then extracting the value.. Then you'd see the difference, I believe. I remember suggesting a similar key column solution to Andrie's answer and Matthew weighing in to explain this (or so I think :)) –  Arun Mar 9 '13 at 14:14
1  
@Arun Thanks for the ping. –  Matt Dowle Mar 9 '13 at 23:21

One way to do this using merge():

df2Needed <- merge(df2,df1,by="id",all.x=TRUE, sort=FALSE)
df2Needed <- df2Needed[,c("id","value")]
colNames(df2Needed) <- c("id","v2")

and another (more elegant, I think) using match():

df2Needed <- df2
df2Needed$v2 <- df1$value[match(df2$id, df1$id)]
share|improve this answer
    
(+1) for the match solution. –  Arun Mar 9 '13 at 14:13

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