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I lately studied some code and encountered a derived interface that declares new method with exactly the same name and signature as a base interface:

public interface IBase
{
    Result Process(Settings settings);
}

public interface IDerived : IBase
{
    new Result Process(Settings settings);
}

I'm wondering if there could be a reason for this. According to my understanding I can safely remove the latter method declaration and leave IDerived empty without possibly breaking any code using it. Am I wrong?

P.S. If this matters, these interface declarations also have the following attributes: ComVisible(true), InterfaceType(ComInterfaceType.InterfaceIsIUnknown) and Guid(...).

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, you may be able to get rid of it - but if you get rid of the method in IDerived, it's not actually the same, strictly speaking. An implementation can actually provide two different methods to implement the two interface methods differently.

For example:

using System;

public interface IBase
{
    void Process();
}

public interface IDerived : IBase
{
    new void Process();
}

public class FunkyImpl : IDerived
{
    void IBase.Process()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("IBase.Process");
    }

    void IDerived.Process()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("IDerived.Process");
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var funky = new FunkyImpl();
        IBase b = funky;
        IDerived d = funky;
        b.Process();
        d.Process();
    }
}
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Thank you, Jon. So I will adjust my question a bit: if I remove IDerived.Process method and all the code using it will compile is there theoretical possibility to introduce some runtime bugs into the code? –  user835103 Mar 9 '13 at 15:10
1  
@user835103: If all the code still compiles (all code both implementing and using the interfaces) then it should be okay. –  Jon Skeet Mar 9 '13 at 17:56

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