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I have one file full with records like this:

"Full name","URL-style name","key_1a","key_2a"
"Full name","URL-style name","key_1b","key_2b"
"Full name","URL-style name","key_1c","key_2c"
...

I have another file full with records like this:

"URL-style name","key_1a","key_2a"
"URL-style name","key_1b","key_2b"
"URL-style name","key_1c","key_2c"
...

Knowing that ("key_1","key_2") is a primary key (unique), I'd like to add in the second file the "Full name" column.

How would you do this? I'm looking for a solution with vim or in bash shell script.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Let's take a modified version of your sample data:

file1

"Full nameA","URL-style name","key_1a","key_2a"
"Full nameB","URL-style name","key_1b","key_2b"
"Full nameC","URL-style name","key_1c","key_2c"

file2

"URL-style name1","key_1a","key_2a"
"URL-style name2","key_1b","key_2b"
"URL-style name3","key_1c","key_2c"

Processing

As noted in a comment, one limitation of the join command is that it can only join on a single column, but the question has a compound key with two columns. There are ways around that, of course: basically, you reformat the inputs to join so that the composite column is identifiable as a single column under the delimiter used, and you have to ensure that the data in each file is sorted correctly in order of that composite column. Nevertheless, join is probably the way to do it; there's just some prep-work and post-processing required. Also, Bash v4 has 'process substitution' which is very useful for this command.

  1. Generate a joinable file from file1 with the data we need.

    There are several ways to do this; both sed (somewhat inscrutably) or awk could be used:

    $ sed 's/\([^,]*\),[^,]*,\([^,]*\),\([^,]*\)/\2:\3,\1/' file1
    "key_1a":"key_2a","Full nameA"
    "key_1b":"key_2b","Full nameB"
    "key_1c":"key_2c","Full nameC"
    $ awk -F, '{ printf "%s:%s,%s\n", $3, $4, $1 }' file1
    "key_1a":"key_2a","Full nameA"
    "key_1b":"key_2b","Full nameB"
    "key_1c":"key_2c","Full nameC"
    $
    
  2. Generate a joinable file from file2 with the data we need:

    $ sed 's/\([^,]*\),\([^,]*\),\([^,]*\)/\2:\3,\1/' file2
    "key_1a":"key_2a","URL-style name1"
    "key_1b":"key_2b","URL-style name2"
    "key_1c":"key_2c","URL-style name3"
    $ awk -F, '{ printf "%s:%s,%s\n", $2, $3, $1 }' file2
    "key_1a":"key_2a","URL-style name1"
    "key_1b":"key_2b","URL-style name2"
    "key_1c":"key_2c","URL-style name3"
    $ 
    
  3. Given this preprocessing, a straight sort suffices to get the data ready for join.

    $ join -t, -o 2.2,0,1.2 \
    >      <(awk -F, '{ printf "%s:%s,%s\n", $3, $4, $1 }' file1 | sort) \
    >      <(awk -F, '{ printf "%s:%s,%s\n", $2, $3, $1 }' file2 | sort)
    "URL-style name1","key_1a":"key_2a","Full nameA"
    "URL-style name2","key_1b":"key_2b","Full nameB"
    "URL-style name3","key_1c":"key_2c","Full nameC"
    $ 
    
  4. And now we need to post-process the colon into a comma:

    $ join -t, -o 2.2,0,1.2 \
    >      <(awk -F, '{ printf "%s:%s,%s\n", $3, $4, $1 }' file1 | sort) \
    >      <(awk -F, '{ printf "%s:%s,%s\n", $2, $3, $1 }' file2 | sort) |
    > sed 's/":"/","/'
    "URL-style name1","key_1a","key_2a","Full nameA"
    "URL-style name2","key_1b","key_2b","Full nameB"
    "URL-style name3","key_1c","key_2c","Full nameC"
    $ 
    

Clearly, you can choose any appropriate character instead of a colon; Control-A (0x01) is unlikely to appear in your HTML.

This assumes that, as shown, your CSV data has no commas in the strings. If you have commas inside the strings, then life is much harder; you need a proper CSV interpreter to handle the data. Perl has Text::CSV and there's also csvfix.

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Hi! I write your answer as the good one because you've put me on the right track: I had to put first the key, then the data, so there are no "sorting problems" anymore (see my comments to H.-Dirk Schmitt's answer) –  Olivier Pons Mar 9 '13 at 17:20
    
No if I try :v/:/ under vim for the resulting "joined" file, looking for line that aren't joined (= that dont have the : char), the result is: Pattern found in every line: :. Thank you ;^) –  Olivier Pons Mar 9 '13 at 17:22
    
@OlivierPons There is no need to preprocess the files to force them into a format for join when awk can handle the whole job very easily. –  iiSeymour Mar 9 '13 at 18:03

If you dont have to match entries with each other, since data is in the same order in both files:

Use Vim VISUAL BLOCK mode.

Open both files in Vim in two windows (:sp <filename> or :vsp <filename> will help with that), start block selection of your desired text with CTRLv, copy with y.

Move between windows with CTRLwh j k l, depending if you have vertical or horizontal splitting.

Position you cursor where you want to paste your clipboard data, press p.

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In awk:

$ awk -F, 'NR==FNR{a[$3$4]=$1;next}($2$3 in a){print a[$2$3]","$0}' file1 file2
"Full name","URL-style name","key_1a","key_2a"
"Full name","URL-style name","key_1b","key_2b"
"Full name","URL-style name","key_1c","key_2c"
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The command you are searching for is join.

Please see man join for detailed information.

If you get an error like pfull.txt:6: is not sorted you may either sort the input files before with the sort command, or give the --nocheck-order option a try.

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I've changed all the records of the #1 file so that they are like Full name:URL-style#key_1#key_2" and of the #2 file so that they are like URL-style#key_1#key_2". If I try join -t: -1 2 -2 1 pfull.txt psmall.txt then I get an error: join: pfull.txt:6: is not sorted:. –  Olivier Pons Mar 9 '13 at 16:03
    
The problem seems to be that the sorting order sort of vim doesnt sort like join expects. Do you know how I could do? How I could sort properly for "join"? I tried also cat pfull.txt | sort > pfull2.txt but the sort bash utility doesn't sort like join expects as well. –  Olivier Pons Mar 9 '13 at 16:05
    
One limitation of the join command is that it can only join on a single column, but the question has a compound key with two columns. There are ways around that, of course: basically, you reformat the inputs to join so that the composite column is identifiable as a single column under the delimiter used, and you have to ensure that the data in each file is sorted correctly in order of that composite column. Nevertheless, join is probably the way to do it; there's just some prep-work and post-processing required. bash v4 has 'process substitution' which is very useful. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 9 '13 at 16:24
    
That's exactly what I've done: I've explained this in my #1 comment (here): I've converted the first "reference" file into a text like Full name:URL-style#key_1#key_2 with in mind using the : as the separator, so that the second column will be URL-style#key_1#key_2, and in the second file, I modified it as well this way: URL-style#key_1#key_2 so that using the : as the separator, there will be only one column. –  Olivier Pons Mar 9 '13 at 17:04
    
But the problem is about how vim and the utility sort sort the strings: sort doesn't like it. –  Olivier Pons Mar 9 '13 at 17:05

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