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I am trying to print a pattern like this

*******
*     *
*     *
*     *
*     *
*     *
*******

In this it should look like an empty box. but somehow I am not getting even closer

I coded this so far

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main( int argc, char ** argv ) {
for(int i=1;i<=7;i++)
{
    for(int j=1;j<=7;j++)
    {
        if(j==1||j==7)
        printf("*");
        else printf(" ");
    }

    printf("\n");
}
return 0;
}

and my output is

*     *
*     *
*     *
*     *
*     *
*     *
*     *

it will be good to have for loop only

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2  
You're almost there, I think! Only need to get the top and bottom rows to print stars everywhere instead of only at the beginning at the end. –  flup Mar 9 '13 at 15:28
1  
I would replace 'i' with 'y' and 'j' with 'x' to make the code more readable. 'i' and 'j' can easily be confused at a glance and 'x' and 'y' are more typical for row/column coordinates. –  Pete Mar 9 '13 at 17:12
    
Since you seem to be new to programming I want to give another hint: Don't write constants literally at the place where they are used (here, the 7). Instead, introduce named constants (static const int size = 7) and use this in the loops. Why? It's simple: If you want to change the size (let's say to 10), you don't have to look at the code where it is used and replace 7 to 10 and forget one occurrence (or replace another 7 which isn't the size). Also, the code is more readable: Your 7 has a meaning which you didn't write in words. If you write size, it has a meaning. –  leemes Mar 9 '13 at 19:45
    
thank u so much –  shubh Mar 11 '13 at 15:07
    
as a rule of thumb it is a good idea to use variable names that give info to the reader e.g. row instead of i and col instead of j. –  CyberSpock Aug 8 '13 at 8:48

13 Answers 13

if(j==1||j==7)
printf("*");
else printf(" ");

This logic works for all rows except first and last one. So you have to consider row value and make special check for first and last rows. These two do not have spaces.

[Assuming it's a homework, I'm giving just a hint. You almost have done it, above hint should be enough to get this working.]

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+1 for not just vomiting out trivial code, but instead giving an answer that will actually HELP the OP. –  George Mitchell Aug 15 '13 at 3:28

Your if condition simply needs to be:

if (i==1 || i==7 || j==1 || j==7)

That is, you need to check whether you're on either the first or last rows as well as either the first or last columns, and then print a *.

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+1 for explanation –  leemes Mar 9 '13 at 15:32

You are very close. The problem is in this line:

    if(j==1||j==7)

Change it so that it also takes into account the top and bottom rows.

Good luck

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+1 for not just hammering out some code but instead giving the OP a push in the right direction. –  George Mitchell Aug 15 '13 at 3:26

You need to behave differently during first and last row:

int W = 7, H = 7;
for(int i=0;i<=H;i++)
{
  for(int j=0;j<=W;j++)
  {
     // if row is the first or row is the last or column is the first of column is the last
     if (i == 0 || i == H-1 || j == 0 || j == W-1)
       printf("*");
     else printf(" ");
  }

  printf("\n");
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Stackoverflow, spoiling homework assignments for everybody! :) –  flup Mar 9 '13 at 15:29
1  
My personal policy about homework is that I'm not going to help if you are lazy, this is not the case. In addition I don't see any homework tag, how would you know it is homework? Just by personal guess? –  Jack Mar 9 '13 at 15:32
1  
You help better if you explain what should be changed instead of just posting working code at which one doesn't even have to look again. –  leemes Mar 9 '13 at 15:33
    
@Jack A good programmer can learn coding from good programmer like you ! I believe if one explain the code logically a bit then its helpful I have been teacher and I frequently have to answer as you given. –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 9 '13 at 15:36
    
What shall I actually explain? The condition is self explanatory, I mean are we talking about explaining "if row is the first or row is the last or column is the first of column is the last"? That is what is implicitly done by using two constants instead that magic numbers. I guess the OP already knows about OR and about indices otherwise we wouldn't see a single line of code. –  Jack Mar 9 '13 at 15:36

This function will work fine:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

void printBox(int width, int height) {
    if (width < 2 or height < 1) return;
    for (int i = 1; i <= height; i++) {
        if (i == 1 or i == height) {
            std::string o(width, '*');
            std::cout << o << std::endl;
        } else {
            std::string o(width-2, ' ');
            o = '*' + o + '*';
            std::cout << o << std::endl;
        }
    }
}

It can be used as:

printBox(2, 2);

which prints:

**
**

Or as:

printBox(6, 4);

which prints:

******
*    *
*    *
******
share|improve this answer

Since I'm not expert in programming, I came up with this simple code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i,j,k,n;

    printf("Enter no of rows : \n");
    scanf("%d", &n);

    for(i=0; i<n; i++)
    {
        if(i == 0 || i == (n-1))
        {
            for(j=0; j <n-1; j++)
                printf("*");
        }              
        else
        {
            for(k=0; k<n; k++)
            {
                if (k == 0 || k == (n-2))
                    printf("*");
                else
                    printf(" ");
            }
        }

        printf("\n");
    }

    return 0; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you ataravati for the indentation. –  PallavSharma Aug 8 '13 at 5:59
    
This is nice and simple. –  CantGetANick Aug 8 '13 at 12:47
for(int j=1;j<=7;j++)
{
    if(j==1||j==7)
        printf("*******\n");
    else
        printf("*     *\n");
}

printf("\n");
share|improve this answer

You are treating all lines equally and ignoring the fact that the first and last line must be handled differently. You need something like

if (i == 1 || i == 7)
{
    for (j=1;j<7;j++) printf("*");
    printf("\n");
}
else { /* your routine */ }
share|improve this answer

This is what your code should look like:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main( int argc, char ** argv ) {
for(int i=1;i<=7;i++)
{
    for(int j=1;j<=7;j++)
    {
        if(j == 1 || j == 7)
           printf("*");
        else if (i == 1 || i == 7 ) //added this check
             printf ("*");
        else printf(" ");
    }



    printf("\n");
}
return 0;
}

Live example

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You'll need a nested loop. Because you've two options in between their, you'll need two nested loops. One for spaces and one for the filling '*' in iteration 1 and 7 (0 and 6).

Print the line 1 and 7 with a '*' filling the boundary stars. Using

if (i == 0 || i == 7)  // in-case you're initializing i with 0
    // loop for printf ("*");
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As others said, you need to handle first and last row. One way to build each line is to make use of one of string constructors, so you don't need to write the inner loop.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int height = 7, width = 7;

    for( int i=0; i<height; i++ )
    {
        char c = (i == 0 || i == height-1) ? '*' : ' ';
        string line(width, c);
        line[0] = line[width-1] = '*';
        cout << line << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
#include <iostream>
#include<iomanip>
using namespace std;

main()
{
      int Width;
      char MyChar;
      int LCV;    //Loop control
      int LCVC, LCVR;    //Loop control for LCVC=Columns LCVR=Rows

      cout<<"\nEnter Width: "; cin>>Width;
      cout<<"\nEnter a Character: "; cin>>MyChar;

      for (LCV=1;LCV<=Width;LCV++)
      {cout<<MyChar;}
      cout<<endl;
      for(LCVC=1;LCVC<=Width;LCVC++)
      { cout<<MyChar<<setw(Width-1)<<MyChar<<endl;

      }
      for (LCV=1;LCV<=Width;LCV++)
      {cout<<MyChar;}
      cout<<endl;
      system("pause");
}

/*
Enter Width: 6

Enter a Character: #
######
#    #
#    #
#    #
#    #
#    #
#    #
######
Press any key to continue . . .
*/
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Print this pattern enter a number=each number for example 23517 **



*


Then ** * ***** * ******* then ** * * * ***** *


and * * * * *

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1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! It appears that your answer underwent some incorrect formatting. Can you fix it? –  Celeo Mar 4 at 16:23

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