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I wrote the function int compare_16bytes(__m128i lhs, __m128i rhs) in order to compare two 16 byte numbers using SSE instructions: this function returns how many bytes are equal after performing the comparison.

Now I would like use the above function in order to compare two byte arrays of arbitrary length: the length may not be a multiple of 16 bytes, so I need deal with this problem. How could I complete the implementation of the function below? How could I improve the function below?

int fast_compare(const char* s, const char* t, int length)
{
    int result = 0;

    const char* sPtr = s;
    const char* tPtr = t;

    while(...)
    {
        const __m128i* lhs = (const __m128i*)sPtr;
        const __m128i* rhs = (const __m128i*)tPtr;

        // compare the next 16 bytes of s and t
        result += compare_16bytes(*lhs,*rhs);

        sPtr += 16;
        tPtr += 16;
    }

    return result;
}
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1  
Use a for loop (length / 16 times), and pad zeros to lhs and ones to rhs if the remaining bytes are less than 16. The padding should be different so that it doesn't falsely count the padding as equal. –  Oguz Meteer Mar 9 '13 at 17:42
1  
while (length >= 16) { /* use your function */ length -= 16; } if (length) /* use a version that compares length (up to 15) bytes */; –  pmg Mar 9 '13 at 17:42
    
FYI this is often called the Hamming distance – this may be useful as a search term. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 9 '13 at 18:02
    
The C library includes functions like memset() that work on any number of bytes, but must be fast. For speed these may be implemented as inline functions, so you might be able to find source for them in an include file. Studying how they are implemented may help you solve this problem. Also check Agner Fog's asm library: agner.org/optimize/#asmlib –  steveha Mar 9 '13 at 18:12
1  
A better approach is to not use your compare_16bytes function at all and do a compare/accumulate vertically. Then at the end do a reduction. (You will also need to do a reduction every 255 iterations to keep the sum vector from overflowing.) –  Mysticial Mar 9 '13 at 18:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As @Mysticial says in the comments above, do the compare and sum vertically and then just sum horizontally at the end of the main loop:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <emmintrin.h>

// reference implementation
int fast_compare_ref(const char *s, const char *t, int length)
{
    int result = 0;
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
    {
        if (s[i] == t[i])
            result++;
    }
    return result;
}

// optimised implementation
int fast_compare(const char *s, const char *t, int length)
{
    int result = 0;
    int i;

    __m128i vsum = _mm_set1_epi32(0);
    for (i = 0; i < length - 15; i += 16)
    {
        __m128i vs, vt, v, vh, vl, vtemp;

        vs = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i *)&s[i]); // load 16 chars from input
        vt = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i *)&t[i]);
        v = _mm_cmpeq_epi8(vs, vt);             // compare
        vh = _mm_unpackhi_epi8(v, v);           // unpack compare result into 2 x 8 x 16 bit vectors
        vl = _mm_unpacklo_epi8(v, v);
        vtemp = _mm_madd_epi16(vh, vh);         // accumulate 16 bit vectors into 4 x 32 bit partial sums
        vsum = _mm_add_epi32(vsum, vtemp);
        vtemp = _mm_madd_epi16(vl, vl);
        vsum = _mm_add_epi32(vsum, vtemp);
    }

    // get sum of 4 x 32 bit partial sums
    vsum = _mm_add_epi32(vsum, _mm_srli_si128(vsum, 8));
    vsum = _mm_add_epi32(vsum, _mm_srli_si128(vsum, 4));
    result = _mm_cvtsi128_si32(vsum);

    // handle any residual bytes ( < 16)
    if (i < length)
    {
        result += fast_compare_ref(&s[i], &t[i], length - i);
    }

    return result;
}

// test harness
int main(void)
{
    const int n = 1000000;
    char *s = malloc(n);
    char *t = malloc(n);
    int i, result_ref, result;

    srand(time(NULL));

    for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        s[i] = rand();
        t[i] = rand();
    }

    result_ref = fast_compare_ref(s, t, n);
    result = fast_compare(s, t, n);

    printf("result_ref = %d, result = %d\n", result_ref, result);;

    return 0;
}

Compile and run the above test harness:

$ gcc -Wall -O3 -msse3 fast_compare.c -o fast_compare
$ ./fast_compare
result_ref = 3955, result = 3955
$ ./fast_compare
result_ref = 3947, result = 3947
$ ./fast_compare
result_ref = 3945, result = 3945

Note that there is one possibly non-obvious trick in the above SSE code where we use _mm_madd_epi16 to unpack and accumulate 16 bit 0/-1 values to 32 bit partial sums. We take advantage of the fact that -1*-1 = 1 (and 0*0 = 0 of course) - we're not really doing a multiply here, just unpacking and summing in one instruction.

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Great! It works properly! Moreover, is it important that the two vectors s and t are aligned? What is the alignment? –  enzom83 Mar 11 '13 at 14:08
1  
I've used _mm_loadu_si128 in the above example so that it doesn't matter about alignment. If you can guarantee that s and t are 16 byte aligned though then use _mm_load_si128 instead of _mm_loadu_si128 for better performance, particularly on older CPUs. –  Paul R Mar 11 '13 at 21:38

The integer comparison in SSE produces bytes that either all zeros or all ones. If you want to count, you first need to right shift (not arithmetic) the comparison result by 7, then add to the result vector. At the end, you still need to reduce the result vector by summing its elements. This reduction has to be done in scalar code, or with a sequence of add/shifts. Usually this part is not worth troubling with.

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