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I need to swap places of an int. For example, if I call for the method swapDigitPairs(482596), it will return me 845269. The 9 and 6 are swapped, as are the 2 and 5, and the 4 and 8.

If the number contains an odd number of digits, leave the leftmost digit in its original place. For example, the call of swapDigitPairs(1234567) would return 1325476. I'm not suppose to solve using a string and I should use a while loop to solve it. I'm not supposed to use any arrays.

Below is what I have done so far. But I am stuck at the swapping position and I know I need to multiply by the places(like tenth,thousand etc) depending on the number.But I am stuck at this part. What I have done is to retrieve the number one by one.

public static int swapDigitPairs(int number) {

    while(number!=0) {
        int firstDigit = number%10;

        for(int i =10;i<=;i*=10) {
            int secondDigit= firstDigit*i;
        }

        int leftOverDigit = number/10;

        number=leftOverDigit;

    }
    return number;
}
share|improve this question
    
What is your question? – bsiamionau Mar 9 '13 at 17:29
2  
what about doing your homework? – Sleiman Jneidi Mar 9 '13 at 17:29
    
I am stuck at the part where i need to swap the places of the int. – user2135654 Mar 9 '13 at 17:31
    
Since you are not allowed to use string or array you will have to do with subtraction and addition. – PM 77-1 Mar 9 '13 at 17:34
2  
@esej the homework tag has been deprecated. – Bohemian Mar 9 '13 at 17:48
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here's the solution (tested):

public static int swapDigitPairs(int number) {
    int result = 0;
    int place = 1;
    while (number > 9) {
        result += place * 10 * (number % 10);
        number /= 10;
        result += place * (number % 10);
        number /= 10;
        place *= 100;
    }
    return result + place * number;
}

The key points here are:

  • the loop consumes digits from the right hand side of the number, so the odd/even processing distinction is gracefully handled
  • the terminating condition is that there are at least two digits remaining
  • loop logic deals with two digits per iteration
  • use the remainder operator % with 10 (ie number % 10) to produce the last digit
  • integer division by 10 numerically truncates the last digit
  • there is no need to hold the last digit in a variable - it just clutters the code

Here's some tests and some edge cases:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    System.out.println(swapDigitPairs(482596));
    System.out.println(swapDigitPairs(1234567));
    System.out.println(swapDigitPairs(12));
    System.out.println(swapDigitPairs(1));
    System.out.println(swapDigitPairs(0));
}

Output:

845269
1325476
21
1
0
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, but I'd do the while inline, like for (; number >= 10; number /= 100, place *= 100) result += place * (number % 10 * 10 + number % 100 / 10); – Juan Lopes Mar 9 '13 at 18:35
    
why is the while loop condition >9? – user2135654 Mar 9 '13 at 18:49
    
@JuanLopes I would code it as a for loop in preference too, but the question clearly stated that a while loop must be used. – Bohemian Mar 9 '13 at 21:14
    
@user2135654 the loop should only iterate if there are at least two digits remaining, thus the test for > 9 – Bohemian Mar 9 '13 at 21:15
    
oh so meaning to say that the loop will start from 10? and i will do the result twice in the loop because its for the 2 numbers? – user2135654 Mar 10 '13 at 15:35

If you have abcdef

Then ((a+b)*10000 + (c+d)*100 + (e+f)) * 11 - abcdef = badcfe

share|improve this answer
    
And If the number contains an odd number of digits we can easily subtract the left most digit away, do your stuff and then add it back. – PM 77-1 Mar 9 '13 at 17:51
    
why do you need to *11 – user2135654 Mar 9 '13 at 18:16
    
@user2135654 Because 2 digits each segment. – shuangwhywhy Mar 9 '13 at 18:31

a simple solution is

    int i1 = 482596;
    char[] a = String.valueOf(i1).toCharArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < a.length - 1; i += 2) {
        char tmp = a[i];
        a[i] = a[i + 1];
        a[i + 1] = tmp;
    }
    int i2 = Integer.parseInt(new String(a));
share|improve this answer
2  
OP is not allowed to use String or Arrays. – PM 77-1 Mar 9 '13 at 17:48

Here is the code with some test cases

public class ReverseNumberDigit {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(reverseNumber(123456789));
        System.out.println(reverseNumber(12345678));
        System.out.println(reverseNumber(1234567));
        System.out.println(reverseNumber(123456));
        System.out.println(reverseNumber(12345));
        System.out.println(reverseNumber(1234));
        System.out.println(reverseNumber(123));
        System.out.println(reverseNumber(12));
        System.out.println(reverseNumber(1));

    }

    private static int reverseNumber(int orinalNumber) {
        int reverseNumber = 0;
        int x = 1;

        while(orinalNumber > 9){
        int lastNumber = orinalNumber %  10; 
        orinalNumber = orinalNumber / 10;
        int secondNumber = orinalNumber %  10;
        orinalNumber = orinalNumber / 10;
        reverseNumber = reverseNumber + (lastNumber * x * 10) + (secondNumber * x);
        x = x * 100;
        }
        if(orinalNumber > 0){
            reverseNumber = reverseNumber + orinalNumber * x;
        }
        return reverseNumber;
    }

}
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