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I have two sets of ranges of numbers as such.

Set 1: 1..6, 2..7, 3..8, 4..9, 5..10
Set 2: 2..7, 2..6

I want to compare the ranges in Set 2 to those in Set 1, so

  1. count the number of perfect matches (2..7)

  2. count the number of instances of matched low number and mismatched upper number (2..6)

  3. count the number of instances of mismatched low number and mismatched upper number (1..7)

The following code works, but it counts 2. and 3. twice. For example: the range 2..7 from Set 2 qualifies for both 2. and 3.. How do I only record one instance?

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

#Set 1: 1..6, 2..7, 3..8, 4..9, 5..10
my @set1_low = (1..5);
my @set1_up = (6..10);
my @set1 = ([@set1_low],[@set1_up]);

#Set 2: 2..7, 2..6
my @set2_low = (2,2);
my @set2_up = (7,6);
my @set2 = ([@set2_low],[@set2_up]);

my $size1 = scalar(@set1_low);
my $size2 = scalar(@set2_low);

my $low_count=0;
my $up_count=0;
my $match=0;

for(my $a=0; $a < $size1; $a++){
    my ($lower,$upper) = ($set1[0][$a],$set1[1][$a]);
    for(my $b=0; $b < $size2; $b++){
        #If lower and upper are same to set1, $both++
        if ($lower==$set2[0][$b] && $upper==$set2[1][$b]){
            $match++;
            next;
        }

        #If lower match but upper unmatch, $low_count++
        elsif ($lower==$set2[0][$b] && $upper!=$set2[1][$b]){
            $low_count++;
            next;
        }

        #if upper match but lower unmatch, $up_count++
        elsif ($lower!=$set2[0][$b] && $upper==$set2[1][$b]){
            $up_count++;
            next;
        } 
     }
 }
 print "Perfect match: $match\n";
 print "lower match, upper unmatch: $low_count\n";
 print "upper match, lower unmatch: $up_count\n";

Also, if Set 2 contained a range such as 22..32, how would I be able to detect a range that does not overlap with any ranges in Set 1? Any ideas or suggestions?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The main change to get the behavior you want is to loop in the other order, i.e., over Set 2 primarily and then Set 1. This is a more natural way to program it because you are interested in properties of Set 2. Below, let’s look at the changes in detail.

It is good that you enable the strict and warnings pragmata! Definitely keep those.

#! /usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

Because you asked about a completely disjoint range, we will add it to Set 2 here.

#Set 1: 1..6, 2..7, 3..8, 4..9, 5..10
my @set1_low = (1..5);
my @set1_up = (6..10);
my @set1 = ([@set1_low],[@set1_up]);

#Set 2: 2..7, 2..6, 22..32
my @set2_low = (2,2,22);
my @set2_up = (7,6,32);
my @set2 = ([@set2_low],[@set2_up]);

To compute the sizes, scalar context is already implied because you are assigning to scalars. A less wordy way to write these is my $size1 = @set1_low;, for example.

my $size1 = scalar(@set1_low);
my $size2 = scalar(@set2_low);

You want to count complete misses, so here we add $no_match.

my $low_count=0;
my $up_count=0;
my $match=0;
my $no_match=0;

Notice that the loops are inverted, but I left $a and $b alone. For each range in Set 2, the code looks at the ranges in Set 1 in order, searching for the first property that is satisfied. On a hit, there is no need to consider the rest of the ranges in Set 1 because your question states that you do not want to double-count, so we terminate the inner loop with last. Arrange the properties in decreasing order of importance so that the test that occurs earliest in the program will take precedence.

In case no properties match (that is, if $found_match remains false), then we record the whiff.

On a stylistic note, comments that merely restate the code in English are of no value. Comments are for explaining the why and non-obvious information, so I removed them below.

for(my $b=0; $b < $size2; $b++){
    my $found_match=0;
    for(my $a=0; $a < $size1; $a++){
        my ($lower,$upper) = ($set1[0][$a],$set1[1][$a]);
        if ($lower==$set2[0][$b] && $upper==$set2[1][$b]){
            $match++;
            $found_match++;
            last;
        }
        elsif ($lower==$set2[0][$b] && $upper!=$set2[1][$b]){
            $low_count++;
            $found_match++;
            last;
        }
        elsif ($lower!=$set2[0][$b] && $upper==$set2[1][$b]){
            $up_count++;
            $found_match++;
            last;
        }
    }
    unless ($found_match) {
        $no_match++;
    }
}

Finally, print the results.

print "Perfect match: $match\n";
print "lower match, upper unmatch: $low_count\n";
print "upper match, lower unmatch: $up_count\n";
print "No match: $no_match\n";

Output:

Perfect match: 1
lower match, upper unmatch: 0
upper match, lower unmatch: 1
No match: 1

The data structures and style above are slightly unnatural to Perl. If you tell us more about the context of the problem you are trying to solve, we can give you more helpful suggestions.


The strain of adding more tests (such as partial overlap) rapidly pushes you to choose better data structures. Instead of using parallel arrays for the upper and lower bounds—as we might have to do in a C program—treat each range as unit.

my @set1 = ([1, 6], [2, 7], [3, 8], [4, 9], [5, 10],           [90, 150]);
my @set2 = ([2, 7], [2, 6], [7, 8],                  [22, 32], [80, 140]);

With the lower and upper bounds attached to the same scalar (which is a reference to an array in this case), we can now ask whether two ranges share a lower bound or whether they share an upper bound.

sub lowers  { $_[0][0] == $_[1][0] }
sub uppers  { $_[0][1] == $_[1][1] }

With these defined, testing for an exact match is straightforward.

sub match   { lowers(@_) && uppers(@_) }

When testing for overlap, writing $range1[0] and $range2[1] quickly gets tiresome, so below we destructure the ranges into (a0, a1) and (b0, b1). Then we test whether either endpoint of one range is within the other range.

sub overlap {
  my($a0,$a1,$b0,$b1) = map @$_, @_;
  $a0 >= $b0 && $a0 <= $b1 || $a1 >= $b0 && $a1 <= $b1;
}

The code for testing each of these conditions will now be almost identical, with the differences being which function to call and which count to increment, so let’s factor out and associate the tests with their respective counts. Because the tests overlap with one another but at most one gets “credit,” be prepared to permute the order of @tests to get the results you expect.

my $low_count=0;
my $up_count=0;
my $match=0;
my $overlap=0;
my $no_match=0;

my @tests = (
    [\&match,   \$match],
    [\&lowers,  \$low_count],
    [\&uppers,  \$up_count],
    [\&overlap, \$overlap],
);

The core of the algorithm is now startlingly brief. The code resembles the way you would explain it to another human. That is, for each range in Set 2 and then for each of our tests, scan all of the ranges in Set 1. On a match, note the success and proceed to the next range in Set 2. After trying all tests with no success, note the failure and go on.

SET2:
foreach my $two (@set2) {
    for (@tests) {
        my($test,$count) = @$_;
        if (grep $test->($_, $two), @set1) {
            ++$$count;
            next SET2;
        }
    }

    ++$no_match;
}

Yes, the algorithm is terse, but it has quadratic time complexity. This means trebling the sizes of the sets will produce a roughly 9x slowdown, for example.

The output code is as you’d expect.

print "Perfect match: $match\n";
print "lower match, upper unmatch: $low_count\n";
print "upper match, lower unmatch: $up_count\n";
print "Overlap: $overlap\n";
print "No match: $no_match\n";

Output:

Perfect match: 1
lower match, upper unmatch: 1
upper match, lower unmatch: 1
Overlap: 1
No match: 1
share|improve this answer
    
I've been using gene prediction tools lately, and I wanted to compare the predicted genes to the annotated GenBank record since the start/stop position is given. – Stephen Mar 9 '13 at 22:50
    
I'm having trouble if there's an overlap in range. For example, if set1 = 1..34, 90..150, 234..460, and set2 = 1..23, 80..140, the 80..140 won't be detected as a partial match/overlap. – Stephen Mar 9 '13 at 23:52
    
@Greg_Bacon; I was able to modify the first solution to incorporate a check for overlap. The unless statement made all the difference for the non-matches. Thanks! – Stephen Mar 11 '13 at 3:24
my @set1 = map [ split /\.\./ ], split /\s*,\s*/, '1..6, 2..7, 3..8, 4..9, 5..10';
my @set2 = map [ split /\.\./ ], split /\s*,\s*/, '2..7, 2..6';

my (%exact, %lo, %hi);
for (@set2) {
   my ($l,$h) = @$_;
   ++$exact{$l}{$h};
   ++$lo{$l};
   ++$hi{$h};
}

my $exact               = 0;
my $partial_match_lo_hi = 0;
my $partial_match_lo    = 0;
my $partial_match_hi    = 0;
my %mismatch;
for (@set1) {
   my ($l,$h) = @$_;
   if    ( $exact{$l}{$h}     ) { ++$exact;               }
   elsif ( $lo{$l} && $hi{$h} ) { ++$partial_match_lo_hi; }
   elsif ( $lo{$l}            ) { ++$partial_match_lo;    }
   elsif ( $hi{$h}            ) { ++$partial_match_hi;    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can delete the two lines mentioning $partial_match_lo_hi if you want to dump those counts into $partial_match_lo – ikegami Mar 9 '13 at 18:24
    
Technically don't nee both %exact and %lo. You can use %exact for both. – ikegami Mar 9 '13 at 18:26

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