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#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<malloc.h>
char *str_rev(char s[]){
 static char *st = NULL;
 static char *l;
 int i = 0,c = 0;
 st = malloc((strlen(s) * sizeof(*s))+1);
 *l = st;
 if(s == NULL){
  return "INVALID PARAMS";
 }
 for(i=0;s[i]!='\0';i++){
 ;
 }
 for(c=i;c >=0;c--){
  *l++ = s[c];
 }
 l = '\0';

 return st;
}
int main(){
 char a[]="Angus Declan R";
 printf("\n %s \n",str_rev(a));
 return 0;
}

How to free the memory allocated using malloc() in the func str_rev() as i need to retrun the reversed string.

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closed as too localized by jman, Thomas Padron-McCarthy, Mario, Soner Gönül, neilprosser Mar 10 '13 at 21:02

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3  
Is this your real code? It doesn't compile. –  n.m. Mar 9 '13 at 19:07
1  
Please improve your question with a problem statement and a few sentences explaining your solution approach. –  Eric Urban Mar 9 '13 at 19:07
1  
@nm : yes,this is my real code. Its compiling, but the string is not getting printed in the reverse order. –  Angus Mar 9 '13 at 19:11
    
What compiler are you using? The code is not valid C, it is missing semicolons in two places. –  n.m. Mar 9 '13 at 19:17
1  
gnu.org/software/indent –  user529758 Mar 9 '13 at 19:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

(1): First memory in l is \0 due to following reason that is the reason print nothing:

After your loop

for(i=0;s[i]!='\0';i++){
 ;
 }

s[i] become \0 and you assign c=i and in second loop following you are assigning \0 at first point in l.

for(c=i;c >=0;c--){
  *l++ = s[c];  // you are assigning `\0` for first time
 }

You returns return l; and at first position in l \0 is so So in printf statement with %s

printf("\n %s \n",str_rev(a));    

print nothing.

Suggestion:

for(c=i-1;c >=0;c--){
     // ^ c should be i-1 initially 
  *l++ = s[c];
 }

(2): You have two compilation error in question code at-lest. You forgot ; on two positions

 return "INVALID PARAMS"; 
                        ^ 

next

char a[]="Angus Declan R";
                         ^

Third Serious mistake

You are returning an invalid memory address!
what you are doing, allocate memory in st , then assign to l, then free(st) and return l: (read comments)

st = malloc((strlen(s) * sizeof(*s))+1);   // allocation 
l = st;          // assign to l

// code in between

free(st);    // st and l become invalid after free
return l;    // returning invalid memory 

Suggestion: Do you algo work with l and return st without calling free().

(4):

This is not error, But why this useless loop ?

while(c > 0){
  l--;
  c--;
 }

(5): Forgot * in front of l

for(c=i;c >=0;c--){
  *l++ = s[c];
 }
  l = '\0';
 ^ forgot *   it should be *l = '\0';
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1  
@Angus Its not correct. You should try enough hard before posting a question. ..Please let me know if you have any doubt. –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 9 '13 at 19:48
1  
@Angus No problem get ready again try again I have given enough point I think you can rectify your code. –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 9 '13 at 19:50
1  
Thanks. You give hope to improve the coding rather than blaming for the poor coding. I will improve my coding from my next post. –  Angus Mar 9 '13 at 20:01
1  
@Angus Yes its not a big deal. I just passed with C-grad in my college. You just need to read a book + solve each exercise given at back of every chapter. its only 7 day task –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 9 '13 at 20:06
1  
@Angus Read my answer again I made some changes See here is your code on codepad With all comments. You made only mistakes that can be easily improve. Algo-wise No problem indeed. –  Grijesh Chauhan Mar 9 '13 at 20:15

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