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I am trying to select one row per user. I don't care which image I get. This query works in MySQL, but not in SQL Server:

SELECT user.id, (images.path + images.name) as 'image_path'
FROM users
JOIN images ON images.user_id = users.id
GROUP BY users.id
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3  
What is the aggregation logic for selecting an image? –  Oded Mar 9 '13 at 19:25
    
IOW, if a user has more than one image, which one do you want? –  BellevueBob Mar 9 '13 at 19:27
    
just one image doesnt matter –  Antonio Papa Mar 9 '13 at 19:27
1  
Unfortunately, you can't tell SQL Server "any image will do." –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 9 '13 at 19:29
1  
"This query works in MySQL" It works but not always as you expect. There is a reason that it is not allowed in all other DBMS. –  ypercube Mar 9 '13 at 20:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The solutions posted so far using a MIN/MAX aggregate or ROW_NUMBER may not be the most efficient (depending on data distribution) since they will generally have to inspect all matching rows before choosing one per group.

Using the AdventureWorks sample database to illustrate, the following queries all choose a single TransactionType and ReferenceOrderID from the Transaction History table for each ProductID:

Using a MIN/MAX aggregate

SELECT
    p.ProductID,
    MIN(th.TransactionType + STR(th.ReferenceOrderID, 11))
FROM Production.Product AS p
INNER JOIN Production.TransactionHistory AS th ON
    th.ProductID = p.ProductID
GROUP BY
    p.ProductID;

Aggregate query plan

Using ROW_NUMBER

WITH x AS 
(
    SELECT 
        th.ProductID, 
        th.TransactionType, 
        th.ReferenceOrderID,
        rn = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY th.ProductID ORDER BY (SELECT NULL))
    FROM Production.TransactionHistory AS th
)
SELECT
    p.ProductID,
    x.TransactionType,
    x.ReferenceOrderID
FROM Production.Product AS p
INNER JOIN x ON x.ProductID = p.ProductID
WHERE
    x.rn = 1
OPTION (MAXDOP 1);

Row number plan

Using the internal-only ANY aggregate

SELECT
    q.ProductID, 
    q.TransactionType, 
    q.ReferenceOrderID 
FROM 
(
    SELECT 
        p.ProductID, 
        th.TransactionType, 
        th.ReferenceOrderID,
        rn = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
            PARTITION BY p.ProductID 
            ORDER BY p.ProductID)
    FROM Production.Product AS p
    JOIN Production.TransactionHistory AS th ON p.ProductID = th.ProductID
) AS q
WHERE
    q.rn = 1;

For details on the ANY aggregate, see this blog post.

ANY aggregate

Using a correlated sub-query with a non-deterministic TOP

SELECT p.ProductID,
    (
    -- No ORDER BY, so could be any row
    SELECT TOP (1) 
        th.TransactionType + STR( th.ReferenceOrderID, 11)
    FROM Production.TransactionHistory AS th WITH (FORCESEEK) 
    WHERE
        th.ProductID = p.ProductID
    )
FROM Production.Product AS p;

TOP 1

Using CROSS APPLY with TOP (1)

The previous query requires concatenation and returns a NULL for products with no transaction history. Using CROSS APPLY with TOP resolves both issues:

SELECT
    p.Name, 
    ca.TransactionType,
    ca.ReferenceOrderID
FROM Production.Product AS p
CROSS APPLY
(
    SELECT TOP (1) 
        th.TransactionType,
        th.ReferenceOrderID
    FROM Production.TransactionHistory AS th WITH (FORCESEEK) 
    WHERE 
        th.ProductID = p.ProductID
) AS ca;

CROSS APPLY plan

With optimal indexing, and if each user typically has many images, the APPLY may be the most efficient.

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how did you write all that?Thank you for the effort :) –  Antonio Papa Mar 10 '13 at 8:15
    
@AntonioPapa No worries, glad it was useful to you. –  Paul White Mar 10 '13 at 9:54

If a user has multiple images, and you only want one image, which one do you want? While MySQL has loosy-goosy syntax that doesn't force you to make a choice, just giving you any old arbitrary value, SQL Server makes you choose. One way is MIN:

SELECT u.id, MIN(i.path + i.name) AS image_path
FROM dbo.users AS u
INNER JOIN dbo.images AS i
ON u.id = i.user_id
GROUP BY u.id;

You could also substitute MAX for MIN. And depending on the version of SQL Server, and whether in actuality you need more columns, there may be other ways to do this slightly more efficiently (avoiding some of the sort/group work). For example if you wanted the path and name separately, this won't work out so well:

SELECT u.id, MIN(i.path), MIN(i.name)
FROM dbo.users AS u
INNER JOIN dbo.images AS i
ON u.id = i.user_id
GROUP BY u.id;

...since you could theoretically get path and name from two different rows, and this result would no longer make sense. So instead you could do this:

;WITH x AS 
(
  SELECT user_id, path, name, rn = ROW_NUMBER() OVER 
    (PARTITION BY user_id ORDER BY (SELECT NULL))
  FROM dbo.images
)
SELECT u.id, x.path, x.name
FROM dbo.users AS u
INNER JOIN x
ON u.id = x.user_id
WHERE x.rn = 1;

Whether it makes sense to use this variation in your existing case depends heavily on how these two tables are indexed, but you could try this approach and compare the plans / performance:

;WITH x AS 
(
  SELECT user_id, path + name AS image_path, rn = ROW_NUMBER() OVER 
    (PARTITION BY user_id ORDER BY (SELECT NULL))
  FROM dbo.images
)
SELECT u.id, x.image_path
FROM dbo.users AS u
INNER JOIN x
ON u.id = x.user_id
WHERE x.rn = 1;

(And try replacing SELECT NULL with the leading column in a narrow index in dbo.images.)

P.S. Don't use AS 'alias' syntax. That form is deprecated and makes the alias look like a string literal. Also use the schema prefix always, and use aliases so you don't have to repeat complete table names all over the query...

share|improve this answer

You need an aggregate function. The right aggregate function is application-dependent. That means you're the only one who can tell. One primitive hack at it:

SELECT user.id, max((images.path + images.name)) as 'image_path'
FROM users
JOIN images ON images.user_id = users.id
GROUP BY users.id

MySQL's handling of the GROUP BY clause is widely regarded as BAD.

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Use Max or Min as required:

SELECT user.id, max(images.path + images.name) as image_path
FROM users
      JOIN images ON images.user_id = users.id
GROUP BY users.id
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This selects the first (alphabetical) entry if multiple images are available for one user

SELECT user.id, min(images.path + images.name) as image_path
FROM users
JOIN images ON images.user_id = users.id
GROUP BY users.id
share|improve this answer

When using GROUP BY you can only use the columns you aggregate with and aggregate functions for the others.

Here is one way to achieve this:

SELECT user.id, (MAX(images.path) + MAX(images.name)) as 'image_path'
FROM users
JOIN images ON images.user_id = users.id
GROUP BY users.id

Though you are more likely to want:

SELECT user.id, MAX(images.path + images.name)) as 'image_path'
FROM users
JOIN images ON images.user_id = users.id
GROUP BY users.id
share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty sure you can't generally count on MAX(images.path) + MAX(images.name) being a member of images.path + images.name. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Mar 9 '13 at 19:32
    
@MikeSherrill'Catcall' - I don't follow. –  Oded Mar 9 '13 at 19:32
    
@Oded - let say you have \Folder1\Image2 and \Folder2\Image1. Your script returns \Folder2\Image2 which simply does not exist. –  PM 77-1 Mar 9 '13 at 19:43
    
@PM77-1 - How do you know that? You know what they say about assumptions... –  Oded Mar 9 '13 at 19:44
2  
@Oded I'm afraid they're correct. Now, maybe the OP doesn't care that the aggregation returns an invalid image path (after all, since they don't care which one, maybe it doesn't matter whether it's valid either), but strictly speaking I would not expect a result that combines values from multiple rows (I addressed this in my answer). –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 9 '13 at 19:51

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