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This questions is just out of curiosity.

While I was reading the python's object model documentation, I decided to experiment a little with the id of a class method and found this behavior:

 Python 3.2.2 (default, Sep  4 2011, 09:07:29) [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32
 Type "copyright", "credits" or "license()" for more information.
 >>> class A():
    def a(self):
        pass


 >>> id(A().a)
 54107080
 >>> id(A().a)
 54108104
 >>> id(A().a)
 54107080
 >>> id(A().a)
 54108104
 >>> 
 >>> id(A().a)
 54108104
 >>> 
 >>> id(A().a)
 54108104
 >>> id(A().a)
 54107080
 >>> 

The id of the method changes with the parity of the line!

I actually wanted to create a couple of instances of the same class and see if they had the same method object, and I expected that they would be the exact same one, or change every time, what I did not expect was that the method id would be related with the interpreter line being even or not! Any ideas?

Note: I know that there is a mismatch of version from the docs and the interpreter, it just happens that I'm on windows and I have only 3.2 installed

share|improve this question
    
I can't replicate this with 2.7.3, 3.2.3, or 3.3.0 on Mac, so either it's particular to 3.2.2, or more likely has something to do with the Windows implementation... –  MattDMo Mar 9 '13 at 20:41
    
I just tried on 2.6.8, 2.7.3, and 3.3.0 on linux (Arch) and got the same id, so I guess you're right, it is a windows implementation detail, thanks –  hack.augusto Mar 11 '13 at 13:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I will explain wat the line id(A().a) does:

A() # creates a new object I call a

Then

A().a # creates a function f bound to a
A.a.__get__(A(), A) # same as above

>>> A.a.__get__(A(), A)
<bound method A.a of <__main__.A object at 0x02D85550>>
>>> A().a
<bound method A.a of <__main__.A object at 0x02D29410>>

This bound function is always another because it has another object in __self__

>>> a = A()
>>> assert a.a.__self__ is a

__self__ will be passed as first argument self to the function A.a

EDIT: This is what it looks like:

Python 3.3.0 (v3.3.0:bd8afb90ebf2, Sep 29 2012, 10:55:48) [MSC v.1600 32 bit (Intel)] on win32
Type "copyright", "credits" or "license()" for more information.
>>> class A:
    def a(self):
        pass


>>> id(A().a)
43476312
>>> id(A().a)
49018760

Here the id repeats like abab

Python 3.2.2 (default, Sep  4 2011, 09:51:08) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win32
Type "copyright", "credits" or "license()" for more information.
>>> class A:
    def a(self):
        pas
        s


>>> id(A().a)
50195512
>>> id(A().a)
50195832
>>> id(A().a)
50195512
>>> id(A().a)
50195832

EDIT: For linux or what is not my machine and whatsoever I do not know

id(A().a)

will always give the same result except if you store this to a variable. I do not know why but I would think that it is because of performance optimization. For objects on the stack you do not need to allocate new space for an object every time you call a function.

share|improve this answer
    
So how do you explain not being able to replicate the behavior? –  MattDMo Mar 10 '13 at 14:34
    
I would only guess that you allocate the same ressources again and again or maybe you just did A.a instead of A().a –  User Mar 10 '13 at 17:04
    
It should be bound 'method', not 'function'. They're different types. –  eryksun Mar 10 '13 at 19:19
    
@User - no, I ran exactly what the OP listed, using the versions in my comment above, as well as 3.3.0 on XP, but I couldn't replicate his results. I could replicate your code just fine, though. –  MattDMo Mar 10 '13 at 19:28
2  
When you repeatedly create and destroy objects like that, the addresses can cycle either based on contention in a small-object memory pool or, similarly, for objects taken from freelists that are used by built-in types. These strategies minimize the performance hit of frequent malloc/free calls. Try running a gc.collect(), which clears many of the freelists, including the one used for method objects. –  eryksun Mar 14 '13 at 13:16

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