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I was perusing some System classes with ILSpy when I came across this from the System.Internal.HandleCollector class:

internal sealed class HandleCollector
{        
    ... bunch of stuff removed ...

    internal static event HandleChangeEventHandler HandleAdded
    {
        [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)]
        add
        {
            HandleCollector.HandleAdded = (HandleChangeEventHandler)Delegate.Combine(HandleCollector.HandleAdded, value);
        }
        [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)]
        remove
        {
            HandleCollector.HandleAdded = (HandleChangeEventHandler)Delegate.Remove(HandleCollector.HandleAdded, value);
        }
    }
    ... bunch of stuff removed ...
}

How is it that Microsoft can compile this when VisualStudio complains (I copied the class) that the property doesn't have a setter? Can someone break-down why this works yet my copy of VS complains (build flag?)?

This property does not have a setter

The error is on each of the HandleCollector.HandleAdded = statements.

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2  
This is not a property; it is an event. Therefore it doesn't need a get nor a set` accessor. –  stakx Mar 9 '13 at 19:48
    
Then why is VS complaining –  Chuck Savage Mar 9 '13 at 19:49
3  
ILSpy and other tools often have to struggle to represent something that doesn't directly map to the language... –  Marc Gravell Mar 9 '13 at 20:06
    
@MarkGravell That would be the best explanation I've heard yet. –  Chuck Savage Mar 9 '13 at 20:09
    
@ChuckSavage: On 2nd thought, I'd have to agree with Marc. That C# code is actually incorrect. It is a bit like defining a property Foo { get { return Foo; } }, i.e. trying to define a property without a backing field. I'd say ILSpy has produced incorrect C# code. –  stakx Mar 9 '13 at 20:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

We don't need to guess what the MS source code is because it is available here.

This is the declaration of HandleAdded from HandleCollector.cs:

internal static event HandleChangeEventHandler HandleAdded; 

It is an auto-implemented event. The problem is with ILSpy's decompilation. Perhaps you should file a bug.

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That is exactly what I get, at lest with ILSpy 2.1.0.1603 and .NET 4.0 –  Jens Granlund Mar 9 '13 at 20:23

If you want it to compile with an assignment int the add and remove implementations you need to use a field.

Like this:

internal sealed class HandleCollector
{
    private static HandleChangeEventHandler HandleAddedField;

    internal static event HandleChangeEventHandler HandleAdded
    {
        [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)]
        add
        {
            HandleCollector.HandleAddedField = (HandleChangeEventHandler)Delegate.Combine(HandleCollector.HandleAddedField, value);
        }
        [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)]
        remove
        {
            HandleCollector.HandleAddedField = (HandleChangeEventHandler)Delegate.Remove(HandleCollector.HandleAddedField, value);
        }
    }
}
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Thanks Jens, but this is Microsoft code - You could suggest that to them... Anyway, we figure it is the disassembler that is faulty for giving the code I posted. –  Chuck Savage Mar 9 '13 at 20:14
    
@Chuck, actually when I use ILSpy what I got was this internal static event HandleChangeEventHandler HandleAdded; so it's probably a bug with ILSpy. –  Jens Granlund Mar 9 '13 at 20:18
    
@ChuckSavage: No, it is not Microsoft code. It is ILSpy-produced C# code generated for a Microsoft assembly (containing CIL bytecode). And something must have gone wrong in the translation from bytecode to C#. –  stakx Mar 9 '13 at 20:20

Let's strip a few unimportant bits from that code:

event HandleChangeEventHandler HandleAdded
{
    add
    {
        HandleAdded = (HandleChangeEventHandler)Delegate.Combine(HandleAdded, value);
    }
    remove
    {
        HandleAdded = (HandleChangeEventHandler)Delegate.Remove(HandleAdded, value);
    }
}

This is incorrect C# code. Typically, there would have to be a backing delegate for this event. Assigning to the event HandleAdded makes about as much sense as this:

int Foo
{
    set
    {
        Foo = value;
    }
}

So I would guess that ILSpy has simply produced incorrect C# code. Basically HandleAdded is just a normal event without any special accessors. If you e.g. look at the same event with JustDecompile, that's exactly what you'll see — no custom accessor methods at all!

To get this to compile, try adding a backing delegate and replace the assignment target:

event HandleChangeEventHandler HandleAdded
{
    add
    {
        handleAdded = (HandleChangeEventHandler)Delegate.Combine(handleAdded, value);
    }// ^                                                        ^
    remove
    {
        handleAdded = (HandleChangeEventHandler)Delegate.Remove(handleAdded, value);
    }// ^                                                       ^
}
HandleChangeEventHandler handleAdded;  // <--
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