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Assume the following relations:

Blog has_many Posts has_many Comments has_one Author

If I want to get all Blogs with all Posts, I could write:

Blog.all.as_json(:include => :posts)

However this will result in an N+1 query.

So instead I need to write:

Blog.includes(:posts).all.as_json(:include => :posts)

Which works as expected, but is not very DRY, especially when you have nested includes.

For example:

Blog.includes(
    :posts => {
        :comments => :author
    }
).all.as_json(
    :include => {
        :posts => {
            :include => {
                :comments => {
                    :include => :author
                }
            }
        }
    }
)

This problem becomes even worse when I need to query for this same JSON format in multiple locations.

I've thought about putting the as_json relations format in a class method like so:

class Blog < ActiveRecord::base
...
  def self.include_all_json_format
    :include => {
        :posts => {
            :include => {
                :comments => {
                    :include => :author
                }
            }
        }
     }
   end
...
end

Which solves the problem of querying for this JSON format in multiple locations, because I can then just use:

Blog.includes(
    :posts => {
        :comments => :author
    }
).all.as_json(
    Blog.include_all_json_format
)

But of course the Blog.includes() takes a different format for its relations hash, so this:

Blog.includes(
    Blog.include_all_json_format
).all.as_json(
    Blog.include_all_json_format
)

Won't work.

I could put the Blog.includes() relations hash in a second class method, but having two method declaring the same includes structure isn't DRY.


The only idea I can think of right now is using the Blog.include_all_json_format method mentioned above, and then writing a converter method that can turn that relations hash into the format expected by Blog.includes() (essentially just stripping out the :include keys) so it could be called as:

Blog.includes(
    MyConverter(Blog.include_all_json_format)
).all.as_json(
    Blog.include_all_json_format
)

But then it gets complicated when I want to use :only or :except in my as_json format.


How can I DRY these includes up, preferably only declaring the relations format once?

Perhaps there's some way to utilize named scopes or some gems?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You can override the as_json method in your model

For example

class Blog < ActiveRecord::Base

  def as_json
    super(:include => :posts)
  end
end

Then your controller should look like

render json: @blogs

Suggestion

You could use JBuilder, Rabl, AMS or other template library that would allow you to separate the response building out of your controller/model logic. Doing this would definitely DRY up your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. Overriding the as_json would be the same as Blog.all.as_json(:include => :posts) though, correct? Therefore would still produce an inefficient N+1 query. I'll check out those libraries, thanks. –  Marc Mar 9 '13 at 20:47
    
I think the whole point is that you should separate your "view" template from your controller logic. Something like @blog = Blog.includes(:posts).all then render json: @blog without calling as_json but still overriding it the way I showed you would be DRYing it up and prevent N+1 query. –  Leo Correa Mar 9 '13 at 21:23

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