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For example I have simple DF:

df = pd.DataFrame({'A': [randint(1, 9) for x in xrange(10)],
                   'B': [randint(1, 9)*10 for x in xrange(10)],
                   'C': [randint(1, 9)*100 for x in xrange(10)]})

Can I select values from 'A' for which corresponding values for 'B' will be greater than 50, and for 'C' - not equal 900, using methods and idioms of Pandas?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 48 down vote accepted

Sure! Setup:

>>> import pandas as pd
>>> from random import randint
>>> df = pd.DataFrame({'A': [randint(1, 9) for x in xrange(10)],
                   'B': [randint(1, 9)*10 for x in xrange(10)],
                   'C': [randint(1, 9)*100 for x in xrange(10)]})
>>> df
   A   B    C
0  9  40  300
1  9  70  700
2  5  70  900
3  8  80  900
4  7  50  200
5  9  30  900
6  2  80  700
7  2  80  400
8  5  80  300
9  7  70  800

We can apply column operations and get boolean Series objects:

>>> df["B"] > 50
0    False
1     True
2     True
3     True
4    False
5    False
6     True
7     True
8     True
9     True
Name: B
>>> (df["B"] > 50) & (df["C"] == 900)
0    False
1    False
2     True
3     True
4    False
5    False
6    False
7    False
8    False
9    False

[Update, to switch to new-style .loc]:

And then we can use these to index into the object. For read access, you can chain indices:

>>> df["A"][(df["B"] > 50) & (df["C"] == 900)]
2    5
3    8
Name: A, dtype: int64

but you can get yourself into trouble because of the difference between a view and a copy doing this for write access. You can use .loc instead:

>>> df.loc[(df["B"] > 50) & (df["C"] == 900), "A"]
2    5
3    8
Name: A, dtype: int64
>>> df.loc[(df["B"] > 50) & (df["C"] == 900), "A"].values
array([5, 8], dtype=int64)
>>> df.loc[(df["B"] > 50) & (df["C"] == 900), "A"] *= 1000
>>> df
      A   B    C
0     9  40  300
1     9  70  700
2  5000  70  900
3  8000  80  900
4     7  50  200
5     9  30  900
6     2  80  700
7     2  80  400
8     5  80  300
9     7  70  800

Note that I accidentally did == 900 and not != 900, or ~(df["C"] == 900), but I'm too lazy to fix it. Exercise for the reader. :^)

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Superb! Thanks a lot! –  Gill Bates Mar 9 '13 at 20:35
    
+1. In numpy/pandas, as well as in general, creating and manipulating Boolean Masks are great tools in to have in your arsenal. –  Aman Mar 9 '13 at 20:57
3  
How to overwrite (update) rows obtained by selection? –  Gill Bates Mar 10 '13 at 11:26
    
About .loc update - it would be good if you clarify where we get a copy and where a view. –  Gill Bates Jun 20 '14 at 17:36
    
is it possible to filter a pandas dataframe and use the OR operator. For example if there was a column month, could you say df = data['month'==JAN OR 'month' == FEB]? And maybe include a second columns making the query more complex, newdf where col_month = jan OR feb AND col_day = MONDAY or WENDNESDAY –  yoshiserry Nov 27 '14 at 22:26

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