Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am making an Addition Tutoring sample, and I cannot finds ways to check for a user's input. I know there are ways where you could do a compare contrast on little things like, when a student's grade is 90-100, maybe you could apply a MessageBox.Show indicating that this student's grade is considered as an A in most cases. But, I cannot figure out which attempt to use when you are checking for an addition's sum. Like, the snippet below will generate new problems for a user to work on.

private void Newproblem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  Random Numbers = new Random();
  int number1;
  int number2;
  int Sum;

  number1 = Numbers.Next(400) + 101;
  number2 = Numbers.Next(400) + 101;
  theproblemLabel.Text = number1 + "  +  " + number2.ToString();
}

But I want to be able to check a user's answers as well. Will someone provide me an approach on how to make that happen? I will greatly appreciate any hints anyone could give me.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, I don't understand what you are up to!? What Input do you want? Are you using a console-app, WinForms or WPF? – bash.d Mar 9 '13 at 21:09
    
what exactly do you mean? do you want a way to see what the user filled in for the result of the sum number1 + number 2 ? – Thousand Mar 9 '13 at 21:10
    
Oh, sorry, I am using Microsoft Visual Studio to do this. – Cindy Mar 9 '13 at 21:10
    
@bash.d she's not using a console application, she's using TextBoxes. they dont exist in console apps – Thousand Mar 9 '13 at 21:11
1  
@Cindy: put all that information in your question, not buried in the comments. – siride Mar 9 '13 at 21:16
up vote 3 down vote accepted

A better way would be to use a textbox for the question and another textbox for the answer.

Btw if you have used the properties before, you could use the property: ReadOnly and set it to true, so the user cannot modify the problem.

Layout with different situations: Not a number Not correct Correct

Example:

//Declare variables so you can use them globally
int number1, number2, sum, userSolution;
Random numbers;

private void btnProblem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  numbers = new Random();
  number1 = numbers.Next(400) + 101;
  number2 = numbers.Next(400) + 101;

  sum = number1 + number2;
  txtProblem.Text = number1 + "  +  " + number2;
}

private void btnSolution_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  // You try to parse the text to a integer,
  // if it works its stored in userSolution,
  // If it fails, it shows the messagebox
  if (!int.TryParse(txtSolution.Text, out userSolution))
  {
    MessageBox.Show("Input is not a valid number.");
  }
  else
  {
    // Check user solution and compare it to the sum
    if (userSolution == sum)
    {
      MessageBox.Show("Correct!", "Problem Solved!");
    }
    else
    {
      MessageBox.Show("Not Correct.", "Please try again.");
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Cindy If you have any other problems, feel free to ask. I like these small exercises :P – CSharp Student Mar 9 '13 at 21:46
    
Just for the sake of teaching. This solution introduce global variables where there is no need of them. Of course, here, they are not a problem, but it is better to avoid them when you can work differently. – Steve Mar 9 '13 at 21:49
    
@Steve Yes it isn't realy needed but you do have to use them here, atleast the sum, since you calculate the sum when creating a new problem, and that way the user can't change the solution if you would change the textbox input, or just put the textbox as read only to prevent this. – CSharp Student Mar 9 '13 at 21:57

You could store the answer in the Tag property of the textbox

number1 = Numbers.Next(400) + 101;
number2 = Numbers.Next(400) + 101;
int answer = number1 + number2;

theproblemLabel.Text = string.Format("{0} + {1}", number1, number2);
theproblemLabel.Tag = answer;

then, when the user clicks a button to confirm its answer, you check against the stored Tag

private void Answer_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  int userAnswer;
  if(!Int32.TryParse(txtAnswer.Text, out userAnswer))
    MessageBox.Show("Please enter a number!");
  else
  {
    if(userAnswer == Convert.ToInt32(theproblemLabel.Tag))
      MessageBox.Show("Correct answer!");
    else
      MessageBox.Show("Wrong answer, try againg!");
  }
}

I am supposing you have a TextBox called txtAnswer where the user types its answer and a button called Answer clicked to confirm the answer

share|improve this answer
    
How about proposing non-hack solutions? This kind of data should be stored in reasonable data structures, not stuffed into extra fields of UI controls. – siride Mar 9 '13 at 21:16
    
Oh okay. Thanks a bunch Steve. (: – Cindy Mar 9 '13 at 21:17
1  
@siride, because this is a pretty simple question?. Because there is no need to add an extra layer of complexity? Perhaps if the user asks how to store a bunch of questions and answers a better approach will be required, but, I think, at this stage let the solution be simple. – Steve Mar 9 '13 at 21:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.