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The _AddPS function unbalances the stack, and is intended to be StdCAll. I have no more information than that, and this is only my second piece of Assembler code (my first was a test .exe that simulated a cdecl function call).

.386
.MODEL FLAT, STDCALL
option casemap :none    ; case sensitive

.CODE

_LibMain proc instance:dword, reason:dword, unused:dword
    mov     EAX, 1      ;
    ret
_LibMain endp

_AddPS proc a:dword, b:dword
    push    ebp         ;
    mov     ebp, esp    ;   // ebp << esp
    push    EAX         ;
    push    EBX         ;
    mov EAX, [ebp+8]    ;
    mov EBX, [ebp+4]    ;
    add     EAX, EBX    ;
    pop     EBX         ;
    pop     EAX         ;
    mov     esp, ebp    ;
    pop ebp     ;
    RET 8
_AddPS endp
END _LibMain

Compiled using MASM and the following command line:

c:\Asm\Test.asm /coff /Gz /FeC:\Asm\Test.dll /FoC:\Asm\Test.obj /link /SUBSYSTEM:WINDOWS /link /DLL

Edit: The following code works, but I'm hazy on why:

_Test proc a:dword, b:dword
    push    ebp     ; Store the stack frame.
    push    EAX     ; Store EAX. Probably not needed. 
    mov EAX, a      ; Move a into EAX.
    add EAX, b      ; Add b to EAX.
    add esp, 4      ; Move past the stored EAX without popping.
    pop ebp     ; pop the stack frame.
    RET 8 // dword is 4 bytes in .386. We return past the parameters.
_Test endp // Marks where to stop compiling the function.
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Have you tried to remove the "mov esp, ebp"? That instruction shouldn't be necessary and (now I'm guessing) may be the cause of the unbalanced stack. –  j.karlsson Mar 9 '13 at 21:32
    
Can you explain why it's not necessary? Restoring the instruction pointer seems important. –  Narf the Mouse Mar 9 '13 at 21:44
    
The "mov esp, ebp" restores the stackpointer. But the stackpointer does not have to be restored if the number of push and pop match. The ebp is used as a basepointer to access local variables and arguments on the stack. E.g. in the "mov EAX, [ebp+8]" and "mov EBX, [ebp+4]" And it is the "RET 8" instruction that does the stack balancing. –  j.karlsson Mar 9 '13 at 22:00
    
You can read more about different calling conventions on en.wikibooks.org/wiki/X86_Disassembly/… –  j.karlsson Mar 9 '13 at 22:07
    
Thanks. I'll have to look into pushes and pops - My research didn't cover where they pushed and popped to/from. –  Narf the Mouse Mar 9 '13 at 22:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are creating 2 stack frames! When you use the PROC keyword in MASM to create a procedure, MASM creates a standard prologue and epilogue! The first 2 lines are MASM generated prologue, the last 2 lines are your prologue.

PUSH    EBP
MOV     EBP, ESP
PUSH    EBP
MOV     EBP, ESP

If you want to code the way you do and create manual stack frames with MASM and continue using MASM procs, you need to turn off prologue/epilogue creation and turn it back on when done.

This should work:

option prologue:none ; turn off default prologue creation
option epilogue:none ; turn off default epilogue creation
_AddPS proc a:dword, b:dword
    push    ebp         ;
    mov     ebp, esp    ;   // ebp << esp
    push    EAX         ;
    push    EBX         ;
    mov EAX, [ebp+8]    ;
    mov EBX, [ebp+4]    ;
    add     EAX, EBX    ;
    pop     EBX         ;
    pop     EAX         ;
    mov     esp, ebp    ;
    pop ebp     ;
    RET 8
_AddPS endp  
option prologue:PrologueDef ; turn on default prologue creation
option epilogue:EpilogueDef ; turn on default epilogue creation   

You could even have MASM use your own special prologue/epilogue if wanted.

You would of caught the mistake if you looked at your exe in a debugger like olly.

share|improve this answer
    
I loaded Test.exe in Ollydbg and it displayed ntdll. There's not much documentation, either. –  Narf the Mouse Mar 10 '13 at 15:54
include masm32rt.inc
.code
start:
    int 3
    ret

_AddPSOrg proc a:dword, b:dword
    push    ebp         ;
    mov     ebp, esp    ;   // ebp << esp
    push    EAX         ;
    push    EBX         ;
    mov EAX, [ebp+8]    ;
    mov EBX, [ebp+4]    ;
    add     EAX, EBX    ;
    pop     EBX         ;
    pop     EAX         ;
    mov     esp, ebp    ;
    pop ebp     ;
    RET 8

_AddPSOrg endp  

option prologue:none ; turn off default prologue creation
option epilogue:none ; turn off default epilogue creation
_AddPSGood proc a:dword, b:dword
    push    ebp         ;
    mov     ebp, esp    ;   // ebp << esp
    push    EAX         ;
    push    EBX         ;
    mov EAX, [ebp+8]    ;
    mov EBX, [ebp+4]    ;
    add     EAX, EBX    ;
    pop     EBX         ;
    pop     EAX         ;
    mov     esp, ebp    ;
    pop ebp     ;
    RET 8
_AddPSGood endp  
option prologue:PrologueDef ; turn on default prologue creation
option epilogue:EpilogueDef ; turn on default epilogue creation     
end start

When run, the int 3 will bring up olly with your program. This is the code in olly: enter image description here

Can you see the difference?????

So, the stack is NOT unbalanced, the parameters are just NOT where you expect them.

If you want to know if the stack is truly unbalanced, print the value of esp before AND after the call to the function, if the values are different, then the stack is unbalanced.

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