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I'm trying to get my lighting to work in OpenGL, using LWJGL as an implementation library. The problem I think I'm having, is that I don't set my normals properly and therefore the lighting doesn't work at certain angles. Here is the code for the cube I'm testing on:

glBegin(GL_QUADS);

glColor3f(r,g,b);

glNormal3f(position.x, position.y, position.z - radius - 0.1f);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y + radius, position.z - radius);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y - radius, position.z - radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y - radius, position.z - radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y + radius, position.z - radius);

glNormal3f(position.x, position.y, position.z + radius + 0.1f);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y + radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y - radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y - radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y + radius, position.z + radius);

glNormal3f(position.x - radius - 0.1f, position.y, position.z);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y + radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y - radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y - radius, position.z - radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y + radius, position.z - radius);

glNormal3f(position.x + radius + 0.1f, position.y, position.z);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y + radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y - radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y - radius, position.z - radius);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y + radius, position.z - radius);

glNormal3f(position.x, position.y - radius - 0.1f, position.z);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y - radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y - radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y - radius, position.z - radius);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y - radius, position.z - radius);

glNormal3f(position.x, position.y + radius + 0.1f, position.z);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y + radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y + radius, position.z + radius);
glVertex3f(position.x - radius, position.y + radius, position.z - radius);
glVertex3f(position.x + radius, position.y + radius, position.z - radius);

glEnd();
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So... what is this supposed to do, and what is it actually doing? –  Nicol Bolas Mar 9 '13 at 21:53
    
I just want to make sure my normals are OK because I'm not I understand properly how to calculate them... it's a point in front of the surface ? right ? –  Philippe Paré Mar 9 '13 at 21:55
    
@PhilippeParé: No, it's not a point in front of the surface, but the direction perpendicular to the surface, represented by a vector of length 1. You calculate them in R³ using the cross-product of the vectors spanning a triangle. –  datenwolf Mar 9 '13 at 21:59
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Normal vectors are relative to the vertex itself and are always normalized (ie: they have length one).

So, a line like this:

glNormal3f(position.x, position.y, position.z - radius - 0.1f);

Should be replaced by:

glNormal3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);
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