Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm subclasssing OrderedDict (Cpython, 2.7.3) to represent a datafile. __getitem__ pulls a field out of the datafile and sets it on the current instance similar to the code I've posted below. now I would like to override __contains__ to return True if the field is in the dictionary or in the file on the disk since it can be read either way. However, this seems to break OrderedDict's ability to inspect it's keys.

from collections import OrderedDict

dictclass = OrderedDict

class Foo(dictclass):
    def __getitem__(self,key):
        try:
            return dictclass.__getitem__(self,key)
        except KeyError:
            pass

        data = key*2
        self[key] = data
        return data

    def __contains__(self,whatever):
        return dictclass.__contains__(self,whatever) or 'bar' in whatever

a = Foo()
print a['bar']
print a.keys()

If you run the code above, you'll get this output:

barbar
[]

Note that if you change dictclass = dict in the above code, it still seems to work (giving the following output).

barbar
['bar']

Am I doing something horribly wrong?

share|improve this question
    
I'm reading the source and I'm still having a hard time figuring this one out ... –  mgilson Mar 9 '13 at 22:36
    
I'm doing so and I think where is your problem: Take a look at __setitem__ and __iter__. –  A. Rodas Mar 9 '13 at 22:38
    
@A.Rodas -- Yes, that's where I was looking. Maybe I'm just too tired, but I was having a hard time keeping all the logic straight. –  mgilson Mar 9 '13 at 22:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When Foo.__contains__ is not defined:

a['bar']

calls Foo.__getitem__, which executes

    self[key] = data

This calls OrderedDict.__setitem__, which is defined this way:

def __setitem__(self, key, value, PREV=0, NEXT=1, dict_setitem=dict.__setitem__):
    'od.__setitem__(i, y) <==> od[i]=y'
    # Setting a new item creates a new link at the end of the linked list,
    # and the inherited dictionary is updated with the new key/value pair.
    if key not in self:
        root = self.__root
        last = root[PREV]
        last[NEXT] = root[PREV] = self.__map[key] = [last, root, key]
    dict_setitem(self, key, value)

Since Foo.__contains__ is not defined,

    if key not in self:

is True. So the key is properly added to self.__root and self.__map.

When Foo.__contains__ is defined,

    if key not in self:

if False. So the key is not properly added to self.__root and self.__map. Foo.__contains__ effective fools OrderedDict.__setitem__ into thinking that the 'bar' key has already been added.


I found it helpful to play with the following code (adding print statements in __setitem__ and __iter__):

from collections import OrderedDict

dictclass = OrderedDict

class Foo(dictclass):
    def __getitem__(self,key):
        try:
            return dictclass.__getitem__(self,key)
        except KeyError:
            pass

        data = key*2
        self[key] = data
        return data

    def __contains__(self,whatever):
        print('contains: {}'.format(whatever))
        return dictclass.__contains__(self,whatever) or 'bar' in whatever

    def __setitem__(self, key, value, PREV=0, NEXT=1, dict_setitem=dict.__setitem__):
        'od.__setitem__(i, y) <==> od[i]=y'
        # Setting a new item creates a new link at the end of the linked list,
        # and the inherited dictionary is updated with the new key/value pair.
        print('key not in self: {}'.format(key not in self))
        if key not in self:
            root = self._OrderedDict__root
            last = root[PREV]
            last[NEXT] = root[PREV] = self._OrderedDict__map[key] = [last, root, key]
        dict_setitem(self, key, value)

    def __iter__(self):
        'od.__iter__() <==> iter(od)'
        # Traverse the linked list in order.
        NEXT, KEY = 1, 2

        root = self._OrderedDict__root
        curr = root[NEXT]
        print('curr: {}'.format(curr))
        print('root: {}'.format(root)) 
        print('curr is not root: {}'.format(curr is not root))

        while curr is not root:
            yield curr[KEY]
            curr = curr[NEXT]

a = Foo()
print a['bar']
# barbar

print a.keys()
# ['bar']

Notice that you can avoid this problem by making Foo a subclass of collections.MutableMapping and delegating most of its behavior to a OrderedDict attribute:

import collections
dictclass = collections.OrderedDict

class Foo(collections.MutableMapping):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self._data = dictclass(*args, **kwargs)
    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
        self._data[key] = value
    def __delitem__(self, key):
        del self._data[key]
    def __iter__(self):
        return iter(self._data)
    def __len__(self):
        return len(self._data)

    def __getitem__(self,key):
        try:
            return self._data[key]
        except KeyError:
            pass

        data = key*2
        self[key] = data
        return data

    def __contains__(self,whatever):
        return dictclass.__contains__(self,whatever) or 'bar' in whatever

which yields

a = Foo()
print a['bar']
# barbar

print a.keys()
# ['bar']

even with __contains__ defined.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That's it -- I was spending too much time focusing on self.__root and how it gets initialized -- Thinking -- self.__root = root = []; root[:] = [root,root,None] What is going on??!??! :X –  mgilson Mar 9 '13 at 22:45
    
My method of figuring things out is very low-brow -- it generally consists of lots of print statements. :) –  unutbu Mar 9 '13 at 23:00

What breaks your code is the or 'bar' in whatever. If you remove it, it will work as with the change dictclass = dict you mention.

The __setitem__ implementation of OrderedDict is this:

def __setitem__(self, key, value, dict_setitem=dict.__setitem__):
    'od.__setitem__(i, y) <==> od[i]=y'
    # Setting a new item creates a new link at the end of the linked list,
    # and the inherited dictionary is updated with the new key/value pair.
    if key not in self:
        root = self.__root
        last = root[0]
        last[1] = root[0] = self.__map[key] = [last, root, key]
    return dict_setitem(self, key, value)

So with self["bar"] = "barbar", the condition should be False, but it is True even before inserting any item. Thus, the key isn' added to self.__root which is used in OrderedDict.__iter__:

def __iter__(self):
    'od.__iter__() <==> iter(od)'
    # Traverse the linked list in order.
    root = self.__root
    curr = root[1]                                  # start at the first node
    while curr is not root:
        yield curr[2]                               # yield the curr[KEY]
        curr = curr[1]                              # move to next node

Since the code for retrieving the values uses this iterator and self.__root does not contain "bar", this concrete key cannot be returned in the values.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, this is it. Thanks. +1. Of course, in my code, the or 'bar' in whatever is something more complicated that I don't want to remove. I think that hacking around OrderedDict to get it to work properly is going to be too difficult. I suppose I'll just subclass a regular dict and keep a separate __order list. –  mgilson Mar 9 '13 at 22:49
    
@mgilson: Maybe let Foo have-a OrderedDict, instead of be-a OrderedDict? –  unutbu Mar 9 '13 at 23:12
    
@unutbu -- I want it to be a mapping type so that I can unpack it ... I can keep track of the order myself. –  mgilson Mar 9 '13 at 23:16
    
@mgilson: Yes, I think you can do that by making Foo a subclass of collections.MutableMapping, but delegating stuff like __getitem__, and __contains__ to an OrderedDict instance (stored in an attribute). The OrderedDict behavior will remain pristine, while you can do your own thing in __getitem__ and __contains__. –  unutbu Mar 9 '13 at 23:23
    
@mgilson: If you subclass MutableMapping at a minimum you must override __getitem__, __setitem__, __delitem__, __iter__, __len__ and __contains__. –  unutbu Mar 9 '13 at 23:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.