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The problem is to remove every 2nd element until the last one remains. (Assuming the elements are placed in circle)

My program works fine for small values of n but when i use a large value it gives me a java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space message.

Can some help me out as to what I need to do to make my code more efficient and solve this error.

Thank You!

import java.util.*;

public class ArrayLists {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ArrayList myList = new ArrayList();
        int n = 23987443;
        for (int i = 1; i <= n; i = i + 2) {
            myList.add("" + i);
        }

        Object x = myList.get(myList.size() - 1);
        Object y = myList.get(myList.size() - 1);
        while (myList.size() != 1) {
            if (x == y) {
                for (int i = 0; i <= myList.size() - 1; i++) {
                    myList.remove(i);
                }
            } 
            else {
                x = y;
                for (int i = 1; i <= myList.size() - 1; i++) {
                    myList.remove(i);
                }
            }
            y = myList.get(myList.size() - 1);
        }
        System.out.println("Winner:" + myList);
    }
}
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Are you sure this problem statement is complete "The problem is to remove every 2nd element until the last one remains." ? –  Avinash Singh Mar 9 '13 at 22:39
    
This is not related to the answer of the question, but why are you using x and y as Object when you know your list contain Strings? –  Ali Alamiri Mar 9 '13 at 22:41
1  
The most obvious thing is don't use strings (change "" + i to i) but apart from that, what in the devil is this trying to do?! –  Boann Mar 9 '13 at 22:43
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/37335/… –  fonZ Mar 9 '13 at 22:44
2  
Can you say what your program is doing as I suspect it would be much more efficient done another way. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 9 '13 at 22:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The answer to your problem can be computed with a closed form, for if you write the number of elements in your list as follows:

n = 2^m + l

where m is the largest power of 2, such that 2^m <= n

then the winner is w = 2*l + 1.

So here is a more efficient program:

public class ArrayLists {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    int n = 23987443;
    int pow = Integer.highestOneBit(n);
    int l = n - pow;
    System.out.println("Winner:[" +((2*l)+1)+"]" );
  }
}

The answer for that value of n:

Winner:[14420455]

To be honest I did not come up with the solution myself, but remembered reading about the Josephus problem in the book "Concrete Mathematics" (Google will find a PDF, check out section 1.3)

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The answer is perfectly correct! Any more links like this where i can find an approach for a problem in a more mathematical way will be very much appreciated. Thanks! –  ik024 Mar 12 '13 at 10:43
    
However i am not able to grasp the logic it will be very helpful if u can explain it relating it to my problem. Thanks Again. –  ik024 Mar 12 '13 at 10:46
    
I think i have partially understood it :D –  ik024 Mar 12 '13 at 13:01
    
Well, I said I remembered reading about it, not that I understood it myself :), however, for me it always helps to write out examples starting from n=1 going up, similar to what is done in the book on page 10, to guess a closed form that fits the results (e.g. (1.9)). Also the circle diagrams used to establish the recurrence (1.8) are very helpful. Proving the closed form is done with induction, showing that it is identical to the recurrence ... I can also recommend the book "Introduction to Algorithms" by Udi Manber, where proof by induction is used a method to design programs –  Gregor Ophey Mar 12 '13 at 21:16
    
Well thank you for sharing it Gregor Ophey :) May u be blessed with more knowledge :D and keep sharing :) –  ik024 Mar 13 '13 at 14:30

You're building a huge list of strings. So you'll need enough memory to hold all the list. You could make it less consuming by initializing the list with the appropriate size, avoiding temporary copies to enlarge the list:

int n = 23987443;
List<String> myList = new ArrayList<String>(23987443);

You could also use a List<Integer> instead, since that's what the list contains actually.

But a huge list of strings needs lots of memory. Enlarge the heap size with

java -Xmx1024m ...

for example (1024 MB of heap)

share|improve this answer
    
how wud i use java -Xmx1024m in my program and where wud i use it(The exact statement as well). Any link to understand it wud very much appreciated –  ik024 Mar 12 '13 at 10:34
    
The example is in the answer. -Xmx is a JVM option, that you pass to the java executable when launching your program: java -Xmx1024m -cp myjar.jar com.foo.bar.MyMainClass. –  JB Nizet Mar 12 '13 at 11:25
    
Thank you. Well i wud like to know if i can change the heap size in my program directly instead of in command line. –  ik024 Mar 12 '13 at 12:44
    
No, it's not possible. –  JB Nizet Mar 12 '13 at 13:48
    
oh i see. thank you for your help and sharing your knowledge :) –  ik024 Mar 13 '13 at 14:28

This uses less memory but is quote a bit faster as it is O(N * log N) instead of O(N^2 * log N)

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // for (int n = 1; n < 400; n++) {
    int n = 23987443;
    System.out.print(n + ": ");
    result(n);
    // }
}

private static void result(int n) {
    List<Integer> myList = new ArrayList<>(), myList2 = new ArrayList<>();
    for (int i = 1; i <= n; i = i + 2) {
        myList.add(i);
    }

    Integer x = myList.get(myList.size() - 1);
    Integer y = myList.get(myList.size() - 1);
    while (myList.size() != 1) {
        if (x == y) {
            for (int i = 1; i < myList.size(); i += 2) {
                myList2.add(myList.get(i));
            }
        } else {
            x = y;
            for (int i = 0; i <= myList.size() - 1; i += 2) {
                myList2.add(myList.get(i));
            }
        }
        List<Integer> tmp = myList2;
        myList2 = myList;
        myList = tmp;
        myList2.clear();

        y = myList.get(myList.size() - 1);
       // System.out.println("\t" + myList);
    }
    System.out.println("Winner:" + myList.get(0));
}

Note: if you use TIntArrayList instead of ArrayList<Integer> it will use about 1/5 of the memory.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting that u have assigned x and y as int when i used it as int it was throwing error telling "object expected" ca u explain me why and how? Thanks –  ik024 Mar 12 '13 at 10:38

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