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I am trying to create a mouseover navigational site. I have this as my basic design but I wanted to have the main buttons of "Our Team", Locations, and Patient Reources. This is what I had before trying to change to a mouseover scheme...

<div class="title">Division of Gastroenterology</div>
</center>
<div class="left_side">  
<p> Staff</p>
<p><b><a href="faculty.html">Faculty</a></b></p>
<p><b><a href="fellows.html">Fellows</a></b></p>

<p>Locations</p>
<p><b><a href="PCAM.html">Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine</a></b></p>
<p><b><a href="PPMC.html">Presbyterian Medical Center</a></b></p>
<p><b><a href="Radnor.html">Penn Medicine at Radnor</a></b></p>

<p>Patient Resources</p>
<p><b><a href="Preps.html"> Procedure Preps</a></b></p>
<p><b><a href="ProviderNumbers.html">Insurance Provider Numbers</a></b></p>
<p><b><a href="Lichtensteindiet.html">IBD Diet</a></b></p>

I tried this but am clearly missing something...

share|improve this question
    
There are different ways of implementing what you want - do you mean horizontal, or vertical? That is, if you want the navigation menu to be horizontal or vertical? And, if you want it to be a popup or inline? –  jrd1 Mar 10 '13 at 0:12
    
When you say you are looking for a 'mouseover navigational site' what exactly are you trying to accomplish?? –  lmno Mar 10 '13 at 0:13
    
@lmno, I think she's trying to make a CSS-styled navigation bar - where a sub-menu pops out when you hover over the item in question. –  jrd1 Mar 10 '13 at 0:14
    
@LisaLowerHariegel I'm lost as to what this HTML is trying to convey. If that's what is being shot for, why p tags? What's the purpose of the center tag being closed but never opened? In short, can we get a fiddle with what you're currently working with, or an example of what it is you're shooting for? –  Josh Burgess Mar 10 '13 at 0:17
    
I am trying to create vertical navigation where the sub menu displays when you hover over the main item in javascript not CSS. The center tag belongs to a title centered higher on the page. –  Lisa Lower Hariegel Mar 10 '13 at 0:52

2 Answers 2

what i have done in the past is hide the dropdown off the screen, then when the user hovers over a link bring the dropdown back into view.

I accomplished this by using unorderd lists like this:

 <ul id="nav">
    <li>Home
         <ul>Link 1</ul>
         <ul>Link 2</ul>
         <ul>Link 3</ul>
    </li>
 ...
 </ul>

And in the CSS set the main <li>'s position to relative, the dropdown to absolute and :hover of the dropdown sets the left position to 0

/* --- MAIN LINK --- */
#nav li{
    float:left;
    margin-right:35px;
    position:relative;
}

/*--- DROPDOWN ---*/
#nav ul{
    list-style:none;
    position:absolute;
    left:-9999px; /* Hide off-screen when not needed (this is more accessible than display:none;) */
}

#nav li:hover ul{ 
    left:0; /* Display the dropdown on hover */
share|improve this answer

I think you are trying to create a navigational bar as inferred from the information you've posted as well as your general question.

To implement this fully would require a bit of editing and explanation - which will be too long to do fully. So, I adapted a nice solution off the web that uses unordered lists, and CSS and have made it available to you as well as the article from where it is linked.

Solution Attempt: http://jsfiddle.net/zFsaF/1/

<nav>
    <ul>
        <li><a href="#">Staff</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="faculty.html">Faculty</a></li>
                <li><a href="fellows.html">Fellows</a><li>
            </ul>
        </li>
        <li><a href="#">Locations</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="PCAM.html">Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine</a></li>
                <li><a href="PPMC.html">Presbyterian Medical Center</a></li>
                <li><a href="Randor.html">Penn Medicine at Randor</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
        <li><a href="#">Patient Resources</a>
            <ul>
                <li><a href="Preps.html">Procedure Preps</a></li>
                <li><a href="ProviderNumbers.html">Insurance Provider Numbers</a></li>
                <li><a href="Lichtensteindiet.html">IBD Diet</a></li>
            </ul>
        </li>
    </ul>
</nav>

CSS:

nav ul ul {
    display: none;
}

nav ul li:hover > ul {
    display: block;
}

nav ul {
    background: #efefef; 
    background: linear-gradient(top, #efefef 0%, #bbbbbb 100%);  
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #efefef 0%, #bbbbbb 100%); 
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #efefef 0%,#bbbbbb 100%); 
    box-shadow: 0px 0px 9px rgba(0,0,0,0.15);
    padding: 0 20px;
    border-radius: 10px;  
    list-style: none;
    position: relative;
    display: inline-table;
}
nav ul:after {
    content: ""; clear: both; display: block;
}

nav ul li {
    float: left;
}
    nav ul li:hover {
        background: #4b545f;
        background: linear-gradient(top, #4f5964 0%, #5f6975 40%);
        background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #4f5964 0%, #5f6975 40%);
        background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #4f5964 0%,#5f6975 40%);
    }
nav ul li:hover a {
    color: #fff;
}

nav ul li a {
    display: block; padding: 25px 40px;
    color: #757575; text-decoration: none;
}

nav ul ul {
    background: #5f6975; border-radius: 0px; padding: 0;
    position: absolute; top: 100%;
}
nav ul ul li {
    float: none; 
    border-top: 1px solid #6b727c;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #575f6a;
    position: relative;
}
nav ul ul li a {
    padding: 15px 40px;
    color: #fff;
}   
nav ul ul li a:hover {
    background: #4b545f;
}
nav ul ul ul {
    position: absolute; left: 100%; top:0;
}

Article: http://line25.com/tutorials/how-to-create-a-pure-css-dropdown-menu

You can of course adapt this as you need it however you wish.

NOTE: If some things do not make sense, you can always refer back to the original article, use Google, or consult the very good W3Schools reference:

http://www.w3schools.com/css/css_navbar.asp

Good luck!

UPDATE:

The OP forgot to mention that the solution has to be in Javascript.

As such, the best place to begin would be to examine tutorials that have already done what is requested. Here's an excellent place to start:

http://vandelaydesign.com/blog/tools/dropdown-navigation-menus/

share|improve this answer
    
I did update the to use <ul> and such but I need to create the mouseover with javascript not CSS. Any ideas? –  Lisa Lower Hariegel Mar 10 '13 at 2:28
    
I have a few - such as using some libraries, but at the end of it all - they too will use CSS. You can't avoid it. –  jrd1 Mar 10 '13 at 2:46

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