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I have the following flat file employees.txt

100  Thomas  Manager    Sales       $5,000
200  Jason   Developer  Technology  $5,500
300  Sanjay  Sysadmin   Technology  $7,000
400  Nisha   Manager    Marketing   $9,500
500  Randy   DBA        Technology  $6,000

I want to count the amount of people in each department. I know there are shorter ways to do this using a command like awk '{print $4}' employees.txt | sort | uniq -c but I want to learn the mechanics of a while loop, reading the input line-by-line

#!/bin/bash
awk '{print $4}' employees.txt > temp_file

array=[]
while read line
do
        if [[ $array[$line] ]]
        then
                $array[$line]=$(($array[$line]+1))
        else
                $array[$line]=0
        fi
done < temp_file

When I run this script I get the error ./process.sh: line 9: [][Sales]+1: syntax error: operand expected (error token is "[][Sales]+1")

Also - is there a syntax I could use after the done keyword to grab the entries in the fourth column? I tried done < awk '{print $4}' employees.txt but that was incorrect.

Also - is there a way I could store the output of awk '{print $4}' employees.txt > temp_file in a variable instead of a temporary file?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#!/bin/bash

awk '{print $4}' employees.txt > temp_file
declare -A array
while read line
do
        if [[ ${array["$line"]} ]]; then
          array["$line"]=$(( ${array["$line"]} + 1 ))
        else
          array["$line"]=1
        fi
done < temp_file

for k in "${!array[@]}"; do
  echo "$k ${array[$k]}"
done
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Thanks so much! Can you explain what the dollar sign, braces syntax means in regards to the array? –  user784637 Mar 10 '13 at 1:34
    
Dolar sign and braces means you are going to refer to a variable. Then you can write the array name and index. Otherwise bash tries to substitute the name and concat it with [...] stuff so you get $array and [index] separately. –  perreal Mar 10 '13 at 1:38

The use of awk is not required. You could try something like this:

#!/bin/bash       # bash 4
declare -A DEPARTMENT
while read -a field
do
  (( DEPARTMENT[${field[3]}]++ ))
done < employees.txt

for dep in "${!DEPARTMENT[@]}"
do
  printf "%s\n" "$dep ${DEPARTMENT[$dep]}"
done
share|improve this answer
array=[]

is not correct. Bash array is declared like this

declare -A array=()

or perhaps just

array=()

Also - is there a syntax I could use after the done keyword to grab the entries in the fourth column? I tried done < awk '{print $4}' employees.txt

You can try process substitution

done < <(awk '{print $4}' employees.txt)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm still getting the same syntax error even after making that change. Thanks for the tip on process substitution. –  user784637 Mar 10 '13 at 1:18

Two solutions, the first in bash (which is similar to, but more concise than the other given solutions - eliminating the use of awk to pull out the forth column, instead using read).

First, the bash implementation:

#!/usr/bin/bash

declare -A dept
while read -r _ _ _ d _; do
   ((dept[$d]++))
done <<-'!'
100  Thomas  Manager    Sales       $5,000
200  Jason   Developer  Technology  $5,500
300  Sanjay  Sysadmin   Technology  $7,000
400  Nisha   Manager    Marketing   $9,500
500  Randy   DBA        Technology  $6,000
!

for d in "${!dept[@]}"; do
   printf '%s %d\n' "$d" "${dept[$d]}"
done

The awk implementation is very similar:

awk '
   {
      dept[$4]++;
   }
   END {
      for (d in dept)
         print d, dept[d]
   }
' <<'!'
100  Thomas  Manager    Sales       $5,000
200  Jason   Developer  Technology  $5,500
300  Sanjay  Sysadmin   Technology  $7,000
400  Nisha   Manager    Marketing   $9,500
500  Randy   DBA        Technology  $6,000
!
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