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Below, I have created a simple switch statement that works fine. I was wondering how I could change this code so it is switch(c), then case 1, case 2, case 3, default.

Example: if char is 'w' || char is 'W' return WHITE

I tried a simple if statement and it wasn't giving me the correct output despite it compiling successfully. Hope you can help. Thanks! :)

static COLORS color(char c){

switch(toupper(c)){

    case 'W' : return WHITE;

    case 'B' : return BLUE;

    case 'R' : return RED;

    default  : return DEFAULT;
}
}
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case 'w' : return WHITE; case 'W' : return WHITE; –  Ionut Hulub Mar 10 '13 at 2:00
4  
Surely one should try to learn a little C before asking this sort of question, no? Any elementary source on the C language describes the structure and behavior of the switch statement. –  matt Mar 10 '13 at 2:03

4 Answers 4

Try the following

switch (c) { 
  case 'w':
  case 'W':
    return WHITE;
  case 'b':
  case 'B':
    return BLUE;
  case 'r':
  case 'R':
    return RED;
  default:
    return DEFAULT;
}
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switch(c){

    case 'w' :
    case 'W' : return WHITE;

    case 'b' :
    case 'B' : return BLUE;

    case 'r' :
    case 'R' : return RED;

    default  : return DEFAULT;
}

Will work.

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You can simply bunch together multiple cases:

switch (c) {
  case 'w':
  case 'W':
    // Code
    break;
  default:
    // Code
}

See MSDN switch() documentation.

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In your code, you could try switch((islower(c) ? toupper(c): c)) and retain the rest of the code in the current form.

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2  
I would just write toupper(c), but +1 for this different approach. –  user166390 Mar 10 '13 at 2:11

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