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This function takes a character array representing pebbles and rearranges the array into RED, WHITE and BLUE characters. The number of swaps made while rearranging is also returned. The function returns 1 if the input is legal and it is rearranged successfully. It returns 0 if an illegal character is found in the input.

boolean processInput(char *pebbles, int *noOfSwaps){

    int low;
    int mid;
    int high;

    *noOfSwaps = 0;

    low = 0;

    while (low < strlen(pebbles) && color(*(pebbles + low)) == RED)
            low++;

    high = strlen(pebbles) - 1;

    while (high >= 0 && color(*(pebbles + high)) == BLUE)
            high--;

    mid = low;

    while (mid <= high){

            if (color(*(pebbles + mid)) == RED){

                    if (mid == low){

                            low++;
                            mid++;
                    }

                    else{

                            swap((pebbles + mid), (pebbles + low));

                            (*noOfSwaps)++;
                            low++;
                            mid++;
                    }
            }

            else if (color(*(pebbles + mid)) == WHITE)
                    mid++;

            else if (color(*(pebbles + mid)) == BLUE){
                    if (color(*(pebbles + high)) == BLUE)
                            high--;

                    else{
                            swap((pebbles + mid), (pebbles + high));
                            (*noOfSwaps)++;
                            high--;
                    }
            }      
            else
                    return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

^^^ There's my code above. Just one function. Need to know the worst-case complexity of that function and a reason. Thanks!

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marked as duplicate by Guvante, H2CO3, Bill the Lizard Mar 10 '13 at 16:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You should post the code here on Stack Overflow if you expect people to answer. Just paste,select, and hit Ctrl+K. –  Eric Urban Mar 10 '13 at 2:22
    
Please include the pertinent text of the function here. Also you should provide some of your own estimations about the asymptotic complexity of the function. –  Guvante Mar 10 '13 at 2:23
    
my prediction is O(n) –  Kieth Bates Mar 10 '13 at 2:24
    
On cursory examination it appears to be O(n) where n = strlen(pebbles). –  Hot Licks Mar 10 '13 at 2:25
1  
possible duplicate of Dutch National Flag swap - this is the fourth identical copy-pasted assignment question: stackoverflow.com/questions/15258047/dutch-national-flag-swap and stackoverflow.com/questions/15324382/dutch-national-flag and stackoverflow.com/questions/15317965/… –  user529758 Mar 10 '13 at 16:22

1 Answer 1

This line would cause a minimum of O(n) + O(color()) when all of the pebbles are red. If color is O(1) (which it probably is), then it's just O(n):

while (low < strlen(pebbles) && color(pebbles[low]) == RED)
    low++;

The rest of the code appears to only inspect the color of each element once, so that would be O(n) + O(color()) as well.

So I'm going with O(n).

Edit: Scratch that, he calls strlen in that while loop. I'm going to upgrade this to O(n^2). Where n is the length of pebbles. It would be simple to cause this to go back to O(n). Call strlen() once, and cache the value.

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Okay, I appreciate this answer. Are you 100% sure that this current code has a worst-case complexity of O(n^2)...I definitely had the same idea as kainaw, with it being O(n). Please get back to me. –  Kieth Bates Mar 10 '13 at 3:08
    
If the array is all red, then the two lines I've copied into my answer will take O(n^2). The rest of the code looks to be O(n). strlen() is an O(n) operation, and you do it n times when everything is red. –  Bill Lynch Mar 10 '13 at 15:05

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