Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is perhaps one of the most odd things I've ever encountered. I don't program much in C but from what I know to be true plus checking with different sources online, variables macroName and macroBody are only defined in scope of the while loop. So every time the loop runs, I'm expecting marcoName and macroBody to get new addresses and be completely new variables. However that is not true.

What I'm finding is that even though the loop is running again, both variables share the same address and this is causing me serious headache for a linked list where I need to check for uniqueness of elements. I don't know why this is. Shouldn't macroName and macroBody get completely new addresses each time the while loop runs?

I know this is the problem because I'm printing the addresses and they are the same.

while(fgets(line, sizeof(line), fp) != NULL) // Get new line
{
    char macroName[MAXLINE];
    char macroBody[MAXLINE];

    // ... more code

    switch (command_type)
    {
        case hake_macro_definition:
            // ... more code

            printf("**********%p | %p\n", &macroName, &macroBody);
            break;

        // .... more cases
    }
}

Code that is part of my linked-list code.

struct macro {
    struct macro *next;
    struct macro *previous;
    char *name;
    char *body;
};    

Function that checks if element already exists inside linked-list. But since *name has the same address, I always end up inside the if condition.

static struct macro *macro_lookup(char *name)
{
    struct macro *temp = macro_list_head;

    while (temp != NULL)
    {
        if (are_strings_equal(name, temp->name))
        {
            break;
        }    

        temp = temp->next;
    }

    return temp;
}
share|improve this question
    
If your expectation is to get a unique address for both variables, why not define a pointer, allocate and free memory for every run of the loop. Also, your comment in the question is interesting. You mention that you take a decision based on the uniqueness of the address which in this case is a stack variable / memory pointer. –  Ganesh Mar 10 '13 at 3:12
    
Yes I will probably do something like this. Thank you! –  ThePedestrian Mar 10 '13 at 3:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

These arrays are allocated on the stack:

char macroName[MAXLINE];
char macroBody[MAXLINE];

The compiler has pre-allocated space for you that exists at the start of your function. In other words, from the computer's viewpoint, the location of these arrays would the same as if you had defined them outside the loop body at the top of your function body.

The scope in C merely indicates where an identifier is visible. So the compiler (but not the computer) enforces the semantics that macroName and macroBody cannot be referenced before or after the loop body. But from the computer's viewpoint, the actual data for these arrays exists once the function starts and only goes away when the function ends.

If you were to look at the assembly dump of your code, you'd likely see that your machine's frame pointer is decremented by a big enough amount for your function's call stack to have space for all of your local variables, including these arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
So I only get "new" variables when the function ends, correct? –  ThePedestrian Mar 10 '13 at 3:15
2  
@ThePedestrian Something like that. You can get "new" space as well with dynamic memory allocation, ie via malloc(). By the way, this whole field of study is known as computer organization if you're ever interested in learning more about how this stuff works. –  chrisaycock Mar 10 '13 at 3:18
    
I'm actually enrolled in a computer organization class at the current moment. How you explained things make a lot of sense. I just never new that was the case. I assumed "new" memory/registers were used but it makes sense why variables would exist only once. –  ThePedestrian Mar 10 '13 at 3:20
1  
@ThePedestrian Ah, wonderful! Coding manually in assembly during my youth was one of the most educational things I've done. Enjoy. –  chrisaycock Mar 10 '13 at 3:21
    
I enjoyed assembly a lot myself. Unfortunately we didn't spend much time. We learned the very basis and then moved on. Assembly is fun though. Really makes you appreciate higher level languages. Big thanks by the way! –  ThePedestrian Mar 10 '13 at 3:23

What I need to mention in addition to chrisaycock's answer: you should never use pointers to local variables outside function these variables were defined in. Consider this example:

int * f()
{
   int local_var = 0;
   return &local_var;
}
int g(int x)
{
   return (x > 0) ? x : 0;
}
int main()
{
   int * from_f = f(); //
   *from_f = 100; //Undefined behavior
   g(15); //some function call to change stack
   printf("%d", *from_f); //Will print some random value
   return 0;
}

The same, actually, applies to a block. Technically, block-local variables can be cleaned out after the block ends. So, on each iteration of a loop old addresses can be invalid. It will not be true since C compiler indeed puts these vars to the same address for perfomance reasons, but you can not rely on it.

What you need to understand is how memory is allocated. If you want to implement a list, it is a structure that grows. Where does the memory come from? You can not allocate much memory from the stack, plus the memory is invalidated once you return from a function. So, you will need to allocate it from the heap (using malloc).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for mentioning this. I'm running into another issue and it is arising from the scenario you have describe. Thanks! –  ThePedestrian Mar 10 '13 at 20:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.