Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Would like to print out the stored information. How can I solve this issue?

public class schoolTimeTable {

    private static ArrayList<String> timesArray = new ArrayList<String>();


    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Scanner scanner = null;

        try {


        File file = new File("C:/Users/Tommy/workspace/Prov/src/TestPaket/text.txt");
        scanner = new Scanner(file);
        while(scanner.hasNextLine()){

            String[] tokens = scanner.nextLine().split("\\s+");

            String[] times = tokens;
            for(String time: times)
            timesArray.add(time);
            System.out.println(timesArray); 



        }} catch (Exception e) {
        // TODO: handle exception
    }

}}
share|improve this question
    
"Printing" a ArrayList won't (normally) print the contents of the array list, but what ever ArrayList#toString wants to print, which is typically the objects hashCode –  MadProgrammer Mar 10 '13 at 3:02
    
I bet an exception is thrown and since you don't print the stack trace in the catch block, you don't see anything. Never do an empty catch block. –  Cyrille Ka Mar 10 '13 at 3:02
    
@MadProgrammer AbstractCollection (of which ArrayList is a subclass) redefines toString() so that it prints the collection elements enclosed in square brackets. This is documented so I guess one can rely on this. –  Cyrille Ka Mar 10 '13 at 3:04
    
Quite wrong, MadProgrammer. See below. –  duffymo Mar 10 '13 at 3:09
    
@CyrilleKa : You are right. Realised that i inputed the wrong path name. Will not underestimate the importance of stack tracing from now on! Thanks –  JavaLearner Mar 10 '13 at 3:09
show 2 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because nothing is being printed, my assumption would be that the file name is incorrect, or that Java doesn't like it.

Double-check the path, and try replacing forward slashes with (double) backslashes, like so:

C:\\Users\\Tommy\\workspace\\Prov\\src\\TestPaket\\text.txt

And, of course, as others of said, change your catch block to:

catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer
    
The slashes should make no difference (validating the path is also a good idea) - but printing the exception is defiantly a good idea. –  MadProgrammer Mar 10 '13 at 3:46
add comment

You'll do better if you pay more attention to code format and style. It matters a great deal to both readability and understanding.

The catch block does nothing. You should never, ever have an empty catch block. Always print the stack trace at minimum.

Works fine for me:

package cruft;

import java.io.File;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Scanner;

/**
 * SchoolTimeTable
 * @author Michael
 * @link http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15318400/trying-to-read-from-a-text-file-store-it-into-an-an-arraylist-and-print-the-sto/15318413#15318413
 * @since 3/9/13 10:02 PM
 */
public class SchoolTimeTable {

    private static List<String> timesArray = new ArrayList<String>();


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            File file = new File("resources/timeTable.txt");
            Scanner scanner = new Scanner(file);
            while (scanner.hasNextLine()) {
                String[] times = scanner.nextLine().split("\\s+");
                for (String time : times) {
                    timesArray.add(time);
                }
                System.out.println(timesArray);
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

I put this timeTable.txt in a resources file in my project:

1
2 3 4
5 6 7 8

Here's the output I got when I ran it:

"C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.7.0_17\bin\java" cruft.SchoolTimeTable
[1]
[1, 2, 3, 4]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

Process finished with exit code 0

This looks right to me.

share|improve this answer
    
Can't imagine why anybody would downvote this. What on earth is wrong with this answer? –  duffymo Mar 10 '13 at 3:08
add comment

Also is to read the file? I run your code.Is right. The contents of the file is:

demo1,28,feb-01,true demo2,22,dec-03,false demo3,21,dec-03,false demo4,25,dec-03,true

The file name:Visitor.txt I changed a little bit of code:

package test;

import java.io.File;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class schoolTimeTable {
    private static ArrayList<String> timesArray = new ArrayList<String>();
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner scanner = null;
        try {
            File file = new File("d:/Visitor.txt");
            scanner = new Scanner(file);
            while (scanner.hasNextLine()) {
                String[] tokens = scanner.nextLine().split("\\s+");
                String[] times = tokens;
                for (String time : times)
                    timesArray.add(time);
            }
            System.out.println(timesArray);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

The output: [demo1,28,feb-01,true, demo2,22,dec-03,false, demo3,21,dec-03,false, demo4,25,dec-03,true].

In my opinion you the contents of the file format. You compare the contents of the file format. Hope to be able to help

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.