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Or, in other words: Can I verify with matching if elements in a tuple are of the same case class, despite having different values in theirs fields (arguments)? Is there something equivalent to the case[T] below?

sealed abstract class RootClass
case class ChildClassX(valuex: Boolean) extends RootClass
case class ChildClassY(valuey: Boolean) extends RootClass
// and other case classes here...

object Foo {
def compare(a: RootClass, b: RootClass) = {
    (a, b) match {
       case[T] (T(a), T(b)) => a == b
       case _ => throw Exception("a and b should be of same child classes.")
    }
}

I hope I dont have to do:

object Foo {
def compare(a: RootClass, b: RootClass) = {
    (a, b) match {
       case (ChildClassX(a), ChildClassX(b)) | (ChildClassY(a), ChildClassY(b)) | (ChildClassZ(a), ChildClassZ(b)) | etc. => a == b
       case _ => throw Exception("a and b should be of same child classes.")
    }
}

Related: matching

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Why not just define compare in Foo as: def compare(a: RootClass, b: RootClass) = a == b? And let the caller handle the check for types if it returns false. Seems more inline with what to expect from a compare function? –  Emil H Mar 10 '13 at 12:58
    
Good point, but I called it misleading here as "compare". In reality it is an "eval" that descends a tree of case classes. –  user445107 Mar 11 '13 at 0:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The most reasonable solution that I can think of is to simply compare the two items' classes.

(a, b) match {
  case (x,y) if x.getClass == y.getClass => "matching classes"
  case _ => "no match"
}

I am not aware of any construct that works the way you describe, like case[T].

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Better than my present code with isInstanceOfs or lot of cases :) –  user445107 Mar 11 '13 at 0:58
    
One thing you'll have to be aware of if you use this approach is subclasses: class A; class B extends A; val a1: A = new A; val a2: A = new B; a1.getClass != a2.getClass - even though they technically are both instances of A, getClass will return the instance's class, which would mess things up in this approach. –  Dylan Mar 11 '13 at 11:14
    
that's ok, it is the behavior I need. –  user445107 Mar 14 '13 at 18:41

This would be a solution, I guess - if it's really only about the classes:

object Foo {
  def compare[A,B](a: A, b: B) =
    if (a.getClass.getSuperclass != b.getClass.getSuperclass)
      throw new MatchError("a and b should be of same child classes.")
    else (a.getClass == b.getClass)
}

No matching involved... Maybe someone has a more elegant solution? But this is maybe the shortest...

Example test code:

object ObjCmp extends App {
  case object X
  val p: Product = ChildClassX(true)
  println(Foo.compare(ChildClassX(true), ChildClassX(false)))
  println(Foo.compare(ChildClassX(true), ChildClassY(false)))
  println(Foo.compare(ChildClassX(true), p))
  println(Foo.compare(ChildClassX(true), X))
}

prints:

true
false
true
Exception in thread "main" scala.MatchError: a and b should be of same child classes. 
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