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In several railscasts, Ryan Bates uses this custom 'sortable' helper in conjunction with several helper methods (http://railscasts.com/episodes/228-sortable-table-columns). I'll just show you my doctored version.

The 'sortable' helper method looks like this (I've modified it for my own purposes, but the fundamental logic is the same)

def sortable(column, params, title = nil)
  title ||= column.titleize
  direction = column == YearlyDerivative.sort_column(params) && YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc" ? "asc" : "desc"
  link_to title, params.merge(:sort => column, :direction => direction)
end

I am baffled and overwhelmed by this line in the above: direction = column == YearlyDerivative.sort_column(params) && YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc" ? "asc" : "desc".

Even if I did know all the syntactic, algebra-like (makes me think of the div/mult-first, addition/sub-second rules, etc) rules require to follow this single line, I still might not have the necessary ruby knowledge (the "truthiness" operators) to fully understand whats going on here. What I'm asking for is a walkthrough. For starters, my fuses are kind of blown right to begin with, with the direction = column == ... bit. But then I lose all understanding later down the line when another equality operator and a ternary operator step in.

in case you're wondering, sort_column & sort_direction are YearlyDerivative class methods (they don't really have to be there, I just needed to call them from different places so it worked out ok)

def self.sort_column(p)
  YearlyDerivative.column_names.include?(p[:sort]) ? p[:sort] : "revenue_usd_mil_derivative"
end

def self.sort_direction(p)
  %w[asc desc].include?(p[:direction]) ? p[:direction] : "asc"
end

That single line (direction = column == YearlyDerivative.sort_column(params) && YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc" ? "asc" : "desc") contains one assignment, two equality operators, one && operator and a ternary operator. Of course, including the outside called methods, it uses 3 ternary operators but I have no problem understanding that.

Thanks for your patience. I'm hoping that understanding this brings me and other SO readers/searchers some unexpected programming insight.

share|improve this question
    
I fully understand these operators by themselves, but its the oneliner bit that confuses me for the most part. At the same time, I always like to find programming shortcuts, and one liners in ruby are legendary for that. –  coloradoblue Mar 10 '13 at 3:45
    
You're over-thinking it. It's simply a compound conditional used to drive a ternary. –  Dave Newton Mar 10 '13 at 4:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In my option, this is one of those attempts at being clever by consolidating some logic into one line, that really shouldn't have been done. The real end result is it's confusing and would lead to harder to maintain code because it slows down the maintainer as they figure out what it's doing:

direction = column == YearlyDerivative.sort_column(params) && YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc" ? "asc" : "desc".

Breaking it apart:

if (
  (column == YearlyDerivative.sort_column(params)) &&
  (YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc")
)
  direction = "asc" 
else
  direction = "desc"
end

In Ruby we can also simplify that a little more while retaining readability and comprehensability:

direction = if (
              (column == YearlyDerivative.sort_column(params)) &&
              (YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc")
            )
              "asc" 
            else
              "desc"
            end

It could even have been written like this, which is effectively a single-line as far as Ruby is concerned, but it remains easier to understand than the original one-line code because of the use of parenthesis to break the logic into chunks:

direction = (
  (column == YearlyDerivative.sort_column(params)) &&
  (YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc")
) ? "asc" : "desc"
share|improve this answer
    
yes, the maintainer is confused. –  coloradoblue Mar 10 '13 at 4:37

Here it is, step by step:

  1. Set direction to the result of the following statement
  2. Whether column is equal to YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params)
  3. If (2) is true, return the rest of the line
  4. If YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc" is true, return "asc", else "desc".

Or this (roughly) equivalent code:

if(column == YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params))
  if(YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc")
    direction = "asc"
  else
    direction = "desc"
  end
else
  false
end
share|improve this answer

Since you have no trouble to understand the call queue with ternary operator encapsulated in the method, I’d suggest you to disassemble the one-liner and then assemble it back:

def func1
  column == YearlyDerivative.sort_column(params)
end
def func2 
  YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc" ? "asc" : "desc"
end
direction = func1 && func2

Now let’s assemble it back:

#           ⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓ func1 ⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓    ⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓ func2 ⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓ 
direction = (column == YearlyDerivative.sort_column(params)) && (YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "desc" ? "asc" : "desc")

The braces above may be easily omitted according to the operator precedence table.

Furthermore, now you can get rid of functions in honour of total one-liner:

direction = column == (YearlyDerivative.column_names.include?(p[:sort]) ? p[:sort] : "revenue_usd_mil_derivative") && %w[asc desc].include?(params[:direction]) ? params[:direction] : "asc") == "desc" ? "asc" : "desc"

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
BTW, I totally agree with the Tin Man’s comment above. Weird one-liner is much worse than pretty 10-liner. –  mudasobwa Mar 10 '13 at 4:23

I've actually switched my code out to the following

def sortable(column, params, title = nil)
  title ||= column.titleize
  if YearlyDerivative.test_column(params) && YearlyDerivative.sort_direction(params) == "asc"
    direction = "desc"
  else
    direction = "asc"
  end
  link_to title, params.merge(:sort => column, :direction => direction)
end

notice the sort_column method has been changed out for the test_column method, which I find more logical.

def self.test_column(p)
  YearlyDerivative.column_names.include?(p[:sort]) ? true : false
end

the sort_column method is still used by the the 'sort' class method (below)

def self.sort(params); p = params
  order(sort_column(p) + " " + sort_direction(p))
end

** It looks like the first part of the 2-part conditional requirement in the original sortable helper method was useless. It returned true no matter what as far as the && operator was concerned.

def sort_column(p)
  ["a", "b", "c"].include?(p[:sort]) ? p[:sort] : "is it true or false?"
end
bad_params = {:sort => "d"}
x = true
if sort_column(bad_params) && x
  puts "hmm"
else; puts "it implied false"
end
#=> "hmm"

The above nature-of-ruby tests led me to create the test_column method.

share|improve this answer
    
direction = nil isn't needed. In addition, don't use ; to join lines. It is not idiomatic in Ruby, nor does it improve readability. Readability was your reason for your question in the first place, but practices like that reduce it. Go for clarity and easily understood code, conciseness is important but not at the cost of maintainability. –  the Tin Man Mar 10 '13 at 6:36
    
Don't do that. Take the time to write code you'd want potential employers to see. They're all over this site. –  the Tin Man Mar 10 '13 at 6:45
    
haha, "The Man" is studying my habits. Indeed. –  coloradoblue Mar 10 '13 at 7:11
    
Are you saying to not use this simplified helper? It does the same thing and I like the legibility, personally. –  coloradoblue Mar 11 '13 at 2:09

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