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I have a hexadecimal (42 E6 56 00) which should be translated into this float number: 115.2, of course it is float 32 (I've got 115.2 using a calculator). Now I want to perform this operation using C#, I use following code but it gives me strange values:

byte[] bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(0x42E65600);
if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian) {
    bytes = bytes.Reverse().ToArray();
}
float myFloat = BitConverter.ToSingle(bytes, 0);
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1  
I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Mar 10 '13 at 6:00
    
I've found this code and it seems to be ok: uint num = uint.Parse(hex, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.AllowHexSpecifier); byte[] floatVals = BitConverter.GetBytes(num); float f = BitConverter.ToSingle(floatVals, 0); –  Ali_dotNet Mar 10 '13 at 6:06
    
Put that as an answer.. –  Bhushan Firake Mar 10 '13 at 6:08
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2 Answers

The better way to write:

byte[] bytes = new byte[]{ 0x42, 0xE6, 0x56, 0x00 }; // Big endian data
if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian) {
    Array.Reverse(bytes); // Convert big endian to little endian
}
float myFloat = BitConverter.ToSingle(bytes, 0);

Note that BitConverter uses the platform's endianess.

I tested with an IEEE-754 Analysis, it seems that your source data is really big endian, so this is the correct way to write.

You may not know, but BitConverter.GetBytes(0x42E65600); will get byte[]{ 0x00, 0x56, 0xE6, 0x42 } on little endian platform.


If you insists on writing a hexadecimal literal, you don't need to convert the endianess (because it will always be correct, see @George's comment)

byte[] bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(0x42E65600);
float myFloat = BitConverter.ToSingle(bytes, 0); // Always be correct
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thanks, but how can I convert between big/little endian? is there any ready-made function? –  Ali_dotNet Mar 10 '13 at 6:10
    
@Ali_dotNet You'd probably want to read my edited answer. The endianness things are tricky. –  Alvin Wong Mar 10 '13 at 6:27
2  
GetBytes returns a byte array in the platform's endianess. ToSingle takes a byte array in the platform's endianess. So the byte order should never be reversed. (The return of GetBytes is {0x00, 0x56, 0xE6, 0x42} for me.) –  George Mar 10 '13 at 6:28
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I have a hexadecimal (42 E6 56 00) which should be translated into this float number: 115.2

If that is the case then your data is in big Endian format

BitConverter.IsLittleEndian  

This will determine what your bit converted bitness is so you would want the condition to be

if (!BitConverter.IsLittleEndian)

Finally, your endian conversion is wrong. You would not want to reverse the entire array but swap the individual float entries

        for (int i = 0; i < data.Length / 2; i++)
        {
            Swap<byte>(ref data[i], ref data[data.Length - i - 1]);
        }

Combining all these rectification, your code should look something like

   static void Swap<T>(ref T lhs, ref T rhs)
    {
        T temp;
        temp = lhs;
        lhs = rhs;
        rhs = temp;
    }
    static byte[] Big2Little(byte[] data)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < data.Length / 2; i++)
        {
            Swap<byte>(ref data[i], ref data[data.Length - i - 1]);
        }
        return data;

    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        byte[] bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(0x42E65600);
        if (!BitConverter.IsLittleEndian)
        {
            bytes = Big2Little(bytes);
        }
        float myFloat = BitConverter.ToSingle(bytes, 0);
        System.Console.Out.WriteLine(myFloat);
    }

Note You can verify your result from the IEEE Analyzer

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I don't see any functional differences between your for-loop and reversing the whole array (which has only 4 bytes forming a float, anyway). –  Alvin Wong Mar 10 '13 at 6:50
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