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Can someone please explain the exact purpose of the second for loop in the following bubble sort? I understand the first loop is looking at the 'i'th integer of the array, but what exactly is the second for loop looking at?

Please excuse my ignorance on the topic. I've been coding for less than a week now and am somewhat confused on the subject.

void sort(int array[], int size) {
  for(int i = 0, x = size - 1; i < x; i++) {
    for(int j = 0; j < x - 1; j++) {
      if(array[j] > array[j + 1]) {
        int tmp = array[j];
        array[j] = array[j + 1];
        array[j + 1] = tmp;
      }
    }
  }
}
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I guess your first loop is wrong too considering you want to implement Bubble Sort, since the first loop tells the number of passes required to sort a list. In case of Bubble Sort it's equal to Total Number of elements - 1, hence the value of i in my humble opinion must start from 1, if I am not mistaken –  nIcE cOw Mar 10 '13 at 6:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I guess your first loop is wrong too, considering you want to implement Bubble Sort, since the first loop tells the number of passes required to sort a list. In case of Bubble Sort it's equal to Total Number of elements - 1 number of passes are required to sort a list of n elements (n - 1) passes are required, hence the value of i in my humble opinion must start from 1, if I am not mistaken. Moreover, the snippet provided by you doesn't resembles a C Language coding style, in terms of you declaring variables as an when required.

The second loop is basically there to decrease the comparison (Number of elements - pass - 1), after each iteration, since with each pass, we place the largest element to the right side (of the logically unsorted list). Hence since that element is in it's rightful position, so we don't have to compare that with other elements.

  4 3 2 1 Original List
  3 2 1 4 Pass 1
        -
        Now since this above 4 is in it's rightful place
        we don't need to compare it with other elements.
        Hence we will start from the zeroth element and 
        compare two adjacent values, till 1 (for Pass 2)
        Here comparison will take place between 3 and 2,
        and since 3 is greater than 2, hence swapping 
        between 3 and 2, takes place. Now 3 is comapred
        with 1, again since greater value is on left
        side, so swapping will occur. Now 3 is not compared
        with 4, since both these values are in their 
        rightful place.
  2 1 3 4 Pass 2
      - 
        Now since this above 3 is in it's rightful place
        we don't need to compare it with other elements.
        Hence we will start from the zeroth element and 
        compare two adjacent values, till 1 (for Pass 3)
        Here only one comparison will occur, between
        2 and 1. After swapping 2 will come to it's rightful
        position. So no further comparison is needed.
  1 2 3 4 Pass 3
  Here the list is sorted, so no more comparisons, after Pass 3.    


void bubbleSort(int *ptr, int size)
{
        int pass = 1, i = 0, temp = 0;
        for (pass = 1; pass < size - 1; pass++)
        {
                for (i = 0; i <= size - pass - 1; i++)
                {
                        if (*(ptr + i) > *(ptr + i + 1))
                        {
                                temp = *(ptr + i);
                                *(ptr + i) = *(ptr + i + 1);
                                *(ptr + i + 1) = temp;
                        }
                }
                printf("Pass : %d\n", pass);
                for (temp = 0; temp < size; temp++)
                        printf("%d\t", *(ptr + temp));
                puts("");
        }
}
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thanks so much. this made tons of sense. –  user2153167 Mar 10 '13 at 20:39
    
@user2153167 : You're MOST WELCOME and KEEP SMILING :-) –  nIcE cOw Mar 11 '13 at 2:00

Your bubble sort loops are wrong. Here is the correct one:

void bubbleSort(int numbers[], int array_size) {
  int i, j, temp;

  for (i = (array_size - 1); i > 0; i--) {
    for (j = 1; j <= i; j++) {
      if (numbers[j-1] > numbers[j]) {
        temp = numbers[j-1];
        numbers[j-1] = numbers[j];
        numbers[j] = temp;
      }
    }
  }
}

The second loop is doing the main work. It compares each pair and swaps their position so that the larger number goes to right (right being closer to the end of the array).

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this makes a lot of sense. The first loop is what stands out to me the most because of it's "back to front" approach at scanning an array. Is this the conventional way of looking at this sort of c code sorting? More specifically, does this "reverse" way of scanning through an array also apply to selection, insertion, and merge sorting? –  user2153167 Mar 10 '13 at 20:49

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