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I'm not really sure how to interpret them and i'm still struggling to find out what they're exactly doing..

color = self.color2

color = self.fill1 if color == self.fill2 else self.fill2

what is this exactly saying?

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marked as duplicate by Felix Kling, Rohan, pst, rene, Blundell Mar 10 '13 at 10:43

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5  
That is not a list comprehension. It is more akin to a ternary conditional operator. –  Frédéric Hamidi Mar 10 '13 at 7:55
    
Isn't it readable as a line?? –  manojlds Mar 10 '13 at 7:57
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is known as a conditional expression.

The expression x if C else y first evaluates the condition, C (not x); if C is true, x is evaluated and its value is returned; otherwise, y is evaluated and its value is returned.

So, your specific example is equivalent to:

if color == self.fill2:
    color = self.fill1
else:
    color = self.fill2
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This is not list comprehension. It is sort of a syntactic sugar. Ironically it is meant to improve readability.

It can be interpreted as:

if color == self.fill2:
    color = self.fill1
else:
    color = self.fill2
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It's a conditional expression See PEP-308.

So something like this

x = true_value if condition else false_value 

It can also be written as

if condition:
    x = true_value
else:
    x = false_value
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Well, it says exactly what it says: put the value of self.fill1 into color variable if value of color equals to self.fill1, otherwise put self.fill2. It's called ternary operator, you can find more information about it here.

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