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I have this:

//...
      if ((tty = open("/dev/tty",O_RDONLY | O_NDELAY) ) == -1 )
        {
                perror("/dev/tty");
                return 1;
        }
        //...
        if (-1 == (fi = open(argv[1], O_RDONLY)) )
        {
                perror(argv[1]);
                return 1;
        }
        //...
        while (1)
        {
                printf("you have five seconds to enter a line number %d", line); 
                sleep(5);
                i = read(tty, buf, 257);
                printf("read %d\n", i);
                if ( i == -1) {
                        perror("dev/tty/"); 
                        // if nothing was entered read always returns -1
                        //and perror prints: Resource temporarily unavailable. it's STRANGE!!!
                }
                if ( i == 0 )
                {
                        lseek(fi, 0, SEEK_SET);
                        while((i = read(fi, buf, BUFSIZ)) > 0) 
                              write(1, buf, i);
                        return 0;
                }
                //...
                if ( 0 == read(fi, buf, lines_length[line]))
                {
                        fprintf(stderr,"can't read\n");
                        return 1;
                }
                write(1, buf, lines_length[line]);
        }
 //...

So I open /dev/tty with O_NDELAY flag, but it seems something wrong because later read returns -1 (it must return 0). I can't find out what's wrong. And one more question: why does printf("you have 5 sec") print after write(1, buf, lines_length[line]);

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

if nothing was entered read always returns -1 and perror prints: Resource temporarily unavailable. it's STRANGE!!!

That's precisely what O_NDELAY is supposed to do. It doesn't wait for the read operation to finish. If it can't be performed at once, instead of blocking it returns -1 and sets errno = EAGAIN.


As for your second question, you're not flushing output. Try: fflush(stdout).

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for terminal does it do it too? – greensher Mar 10 '13 at 8:13
1  
@greensher When you pass O_NDELAY open tries to make the descriptor nonblocking, without regard to the type of object it opens. Some object types may not support nonblocking operation - from your example it seems ttys do. – cnicutar Mar 10 '13 at 8:14
    
errno is set in EAGAIN – greensher Mar 10 '13 at 8:18
    
@greensher That's right, I was thinking of EAGAIN and typed EINTR, sorry. – cnicutar Mar 10 '13 at 8:19
    
then..how to do it right ? – greensher Mar 10 '13 at 8:21

In early versions of UNIX System for non-blocking operations was used flag O_NDELAY. if O_NDELAY was set, then read returned 0. Since it contradicts Unix convention ( returned 0 indicates end of file), POSIX.1 defined flag of non-blocking mode - O_NONBLOCK. Nowadays flag O_NDELAY is used only for compatibility and shouldn't be used in modern applications.

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