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This question already has an answer here:

I have a simple hierarchy of inheritance and a single interface. Consider class A which will be extended by class B. I wish for both classes to implement interface I and for class A to be abstract. In java I have roughly the following:

public interface I {
    public double foobar();
    public void print();
}

public abstract class A implements I {
    @Override public double foobar() { /*return foo*/}
    @Override public void print() {
        System.out.print(foobar());   
    }
}

public class B extends A {
    @Override public double foobar() { /*return bar*/ }
    @Override public void print() {
        super.print();
        System.out.print(foobar);
    }
}

My intent is to, when I instantiate an object of type B and call its print(), have the object of type B print first the foo from class A and then the bar from class B; however, when I compile an execute this code it calls the foobar() from class B in both cases. For example, if foo were to equal 1 and bar to equal 2, the output of the above code would be the following:

2 2

But I would like it to be 1 2

I have tried calling the method with various typecasting but have had no luck. Any suggestions?

Edit: Thank you for the many suggestions and just to clarify, I want each of the potential subclasses of A to implement I and I apologise for not stating that explicitly. Additionally, I currently have working code by adding an additional method in A privateFooBar() which is called by both A's print and A's foobar; however, I still wonder if there are more elegant ways to accomplish this task.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by casperOne Mar 12 '13 at 13:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
where is your calling code? – Nikolay Kuznetsov Mar 10 '13 at 8:25
    
    
Sorry for not explicitly writing my calling code. When I said "when I instantiate an object of type B and call its print()" I meant public class X { public static void main(String[] args) { B b = new B(); B.print(); }} – Jacob Patenaude Mar 10 '13 at 9:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

foobar() is overridden in class B. So every time it's called on an instance of class B, the class B version of the method is called. That's what polymorphism is all about.

If you want the foobar() method in A to always return A's version of foobar, and don't want methods in subclasses to change that, foobar() should be made final in A.

Or you could delegate to a private method in A:

public abstract class A implements I {
    @Override 
    public double foobar() { 
        return privateFoobar();
    }

    private double privateFoobar() {
        /* return foo */
    }

    @Override public void print() {
        System.out.print(privateFoobar());   
    }
}

public class B extends A {
    @Override public double foobar() { /*return bar*/ }
    @Override public void print() {
        super.print();
        System.out.print(foobar());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I went with the private method option and that worked but Im curious if I would have to change anything in subclass B if I changed A's foobar() to final? To provide context, I have a class which represents a shipping company and the method foobar() represents a CalculateCost() method which returns as a double the cost of sending an associated package. Class A represents an abstract method and has CalculateCost() return weight * cost_per_weight. Child class B's CalculateCost() returns the parent's CalculateCost() added to a double which represents a surcharge. I wonder if there was a better way – Jacob Patenaude Mar 10 '13 at 8:46
    
If A.foobar() was private, you could not override it in B. That's what final (on methods) mean. – JB Nizet Mar 10 '13 at 8:50
    
By "private method option" I didn't mean making A.foobar() private, but instead making another, private class privateFoobar as was recommended in the above post. – Jacob Patenaude Mar 10 '13 at 9:01
    
Sorry, I meant "if A.foobar() was final". – JB Nizet Mar 10 '13 at 9:03
    
Thank you for the clarification. The final notion was in response, again to the posting above. – Jacob Patenaude Mar 10 '13 at 9:06

In your class A , you are calling foobar(), which is overriden in class B

public abstract class A implements I {
    @Override public double foobar() { /*return foo*/}
    @Override public void print() {
        System.out.print(foobar()); // HERE 
    }
}

You can either make the method final or private

share|improve this answer
    
It was just said exactly 5 minutes ago :) – giorashc Mar 10 '13 at 8:34
    
Forgot to refresh page before posting – sol4me Mar 10 '13 at 8:35
    
And you can't make it private. It must stay public to honor the base class contract. – JB Nizet Mar 10 '13 at 8:42

This one is a round about way to foobar. You can call super.foobar() from B, and adjust the overridden print() method. final or private wont work, because then you cannot override the method. Here's the code:

PS: I changed the return types to String to return "foo" and "bar" :)

public class P4  {
    public static void main (String[] args) {
    new B().print();
    System.out.println();
}}

interface I {
    public String foobar();
    public void print();
}

abstract class A implements I {
    @Override public String foobar() { return "foo";}
    @Override public void print() {
        System.out.print(foobar());   
    }
}

class B extends A {
    @Override public String foobar() { return "bar"; }
    @Override public void print() {
        System.out.print(super.foobar());
        super.print();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I considered this option but in my original code, the parent's print is in the middle of a lot of text and would require me to basically rewrite the parent's code for print – Jacob Patenaude Mar 10 '13 at 8:58
    
You are overriding print() anyway, so instead of calling auper.print() which would call this.foobar(), just call this.foobar(). True, this means copy-pasting most of super.print(), but I am sure you have thought about it. Basically, in print() you have both "foo" and "bar", and just need to format it for the application. Regards, - M. – Manidip Sengupta Mar 10 '13 at 9:09

As Class B Override the foobar method of Class A Class B always call the foobar of Class B version.

If you want that Class B will change method behavior of so print that it will print value of foo and bar both without calling super.print().

Define new method for bar in class B instead of Overriding method of Class A.

public class B extends A {
    public double bar() { /*return bar*/ }
    @Override public void print() {
        System.out.print(bar());
        System.out.print(foobar());
    }
}

As you are changing the print() method it is right to Override print() and not foobar() method.

share|improve this answer
    
I considered this option as well, but I was confused by a poor wording choice of my instructor as this is for an assignment. He asked that each of the subclasses of A implement I; however, it's my understanding that to write public class B extends A implements I is redundant. Sorry for not making it explicit that each subclass of A should implement I – Jacob Patenaude Mar 10 '13 at 9:04

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