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I'm trying to initialize an integer array and set all elements to 1. I need the array to have an upper bound of 4294967295, or the maximum number possible for a 32-bit unsigned int.

This seems like a trivial task to me, and it should be, but I am running into segfault. I can run the for loop empty and it seems to work fine (albeit slowly, but it's processing nearly 4.3 billion numbers so I won't complain). The problem seems to show up when I try to perform any kind of action within the loop. The instruction I have below - primeArray[i] = 1; - causes the segfault error. As best as I can tell, this shouldn't cause me to overrun the array. If I comment out that line, no segfault.

It's late and my tired eyes are probably just missing something simple, but I could use another pair.

Here's what I've got:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdint.h>

#define LIMIT 0xFFFFFFFF;

int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    uint32_t i;

    uint32_t numberOfPrimes = LIMIT;        // hardcoded for debugging
    int *primeArray = (int*) malloc(numberOfPrimes * sizeof(int));

    for (i = 0; i < numberOfPrimes; ++i) {
        primeArray[i] = 1;
    }
}
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5  
(a) is this on a 32bit system? (b) regardless, are you aware you just asked for 16gB (or 32gB depending on your int depth) of RAM to be allocated? (c) any particular reason you didn't check the result of that malloc() before using it? (d) if this is going to be an Sieve of Eratosthenes, do you understand you don't need a full-on int for the data member, a bit will suffice, and a unsigned char is the easiest thing to code? –  WhozCraig Mar 10 '13 at 8:42
1  
@BarathBushan Fragmentation applies to a single process, not to the OS. The kernel manages mapping of virtual memory to physical memory, so it can provide a process 16GB of "contiguous" virtual memory, even though that much contiguous physical memory is not available. Just try allocating a 6GB chunk on an 8GB machine, it works just fine despite other processes "fragmenting" the memory. –  user4815162342 Mar 10 '13 at 11:48
1  
"The kernel manages mapping of virtual memory to physical memory, so it can provide a process 16GB of "contiguous" virtual memory" . sorry to break it to you sir , you have never been so wrong lately.....Its not the "kernel" mapping , it is the Virtual memory manager (VMM) , which maps the logical pages(not physical) to virtual adresses ,and it does not provide 16 GB of memory to a process , all it does is provide 16 GB of "address space" not the actual memory , if the process continues to consume all the 16 gb , first page stealing will be a consequence , later a process "thrashing" is done –  Barath Bushan Mar 10 '13 at 12:02
2  
@BarathBushan Sure, but the kernel manages the VMM, and it's the kernel's responsibility to maintain the mapping. The point is that the process can get its "contiguous" memory regardless of OS-level fragmentation, so the OS's failure to allocate has zero to do with "fragmentation". If you don't believe me, just try it. –  user4815162342 Mar 10 '13 at 13:19
1  
@BarathBushan: Address space fragmentation only happens within the virtuall address space of each process. On the system level memory is managed in equally sized pages, which may be scattered all over the place and virtual contigous memory is likely scattered in noncontigous pages. Most OS will make an effort to move pages around to make them contigous (to enhance caching efficiency); and as long as there's one free page around (about 2kiB to 64kiB depending on system configuration) it can do this without problem. –  datenwolf Mar 10 '13 at 15:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Check the return code from malloc() to make sure the array was actually allocated. I suspect that the following test would fail:

int *primeArray = (int*) malloc(numberOfPrimes * sizeof(int));

if (primeArray != NULL) {  /* check that array was allocated */
    for (i = 0; i < numberOfPrimes; ++i) {
        primeArray[i] = 1;
    }
}
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3  
casting malloc ?? Read this stackoverflow.com/questions/605845/… –  Barath Bushan Mar 10 '13 at 8:47
    
@BarathBushan The cast isn't why the OP's program is crashing. –  chrisaycock Mar 10 '13 at 8:50
1  
@chrisaycock Thank you, I had forgotten to check that. And you're right, it isn't allocating. –  idigyourpast Mar 10 '13 at 8:54
2  
@chrisaycock Sometimes it is, so casting is a bad piece of advice. –  user529758 Mar 10 '13 at 8:59
1  
@chrisaycock , yes the bug may not be active right now , but if encouraged , it will show up someday , somewhere , so better crush the bug right now... –  Barath Bushan Mar 10 '13 at 9:00

Your malloc call requests 16 gigabytes of memory from the system. If you don't have that much free virtual memory, or if you are running on any 32-bit system, the call will fail. If you don't check for the failure of malloc, as your code doesn't, the array will be NULL and any subsequent access to its elements will cause a segmentation fault.

If you really need to work with an array that large, you will either need to get a 64-bit system with a lot of memory, or rewrite your program to work with a smaller working set, and persist the rest to disk.

share|improve this answer
    
Regarding the 32 bit system situation: Yes. But on a 64 bit system malloc may return non-null even if there's less than 16GiB of memory (RAM+swap) installed. Modern OS allocate address space not memory. Only when something is written to address space, a piece of memory, called a page is allocated to back the page sized chunk of address space, to which was written. In the case of OP it may simply happen that the system eventually runs out of allocatable pages. –  datenwolf Mar 10 '13 at 15:01
    
@datenwolf The system can certainly overcommit, but malloc succeeding when requesting space that exceeds RAM+swap sounds like an OS bug. Either way, there is no way to portably test for that situation, so one has no choice but to be optimistic and assume that, when malloc succeeds, the memory is available. That's how most software works. –  user4815162342 Mar 10 '13 at 15:28
    
Ideed most OS will set default malloc size limit at about half the available system memory. However most OS allow to change this configuration to allow malloc allocations exceeding available system memory. –  datenwolf Mar 10 '13 at 15:31

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