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I am building a product which uses images from a users Facebook friends. I have found multiple examples on SO which filter the photos by filtering through albums and the users friend list like this:

SELECT pid, link, owner
FROM photo
WHERE aid IN 
  (SELECT aid FROM album WHERE owner IN 
    (SELECT uid2 FROM friend WHERE uid1=me()) 
  )

But why can I not skip the album collection? The following should work, but running it in the Graph API Explorer never returns a result (like a timeout which never occurs):

SELECT pid, link, owner
FROM photo
WHERE owner IN (SELECT uid2 FROM friend WHERE uid1=me())
AND created > strtotime("10 February 2013")
ORDER BY created DESC

The token I am using most certainly has 'user_photos' and 'friends_photos'. Using the regular graph explorer also has the same behaviour, no result is ever shown:

enter image description here

Is this an error in my logic, an error with the Facebook platform, or is there something odd going on here?

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1 Answer 1

Speaking about:

SELECT pid, link, owner
FROM photo
WHERE owner IN (SELECT uid2 FROM friend WHERE uid1=me())
AND created > strtotime("10 February 2013")
ORDER BY created DESC
  • First, this query times out.
  • Second, a FQL query can only gives 5000 results, whereas our friends have uploaded far more photos than that.
  • Third, you tried to improve a first query which doesn't work (in my case, it only found 1470 of my friend's photos).
  • Fourth, even if your second query wouldn't time out and if it could give more than 5000 results, this query wouldn't give all the photos of the user friends. Because this query:

    SELECT pid, link, owner FROM photo WHERE owner=USER_ID only gives the last 100 photos of the user, whereas the user could have 2000 photos for instance.

So at least, we don't have to correct your query, but we should try to make a new one. The goal is not to make the less queries as possible while making complicate queries, but to make something clear that works.

At first, let's try to get all the photos of one user.

SELECT pid, link, owner
FROM photo
WHERE owner=USER_ID
AND created > strtotime("10 February 2013")
ORDER BY created DESC
LIMIT 5000 OFFSET 0

Now we don't get 100 photos anymore, but 5000!

Secondly, we get all the friend users:

SELECT uid2 FROM friend WHERE uid1=me() LIMIT 5000

The max amount of friends for a user is indeed 5000.

Now, all you have to do is:

  1. to make one request that gets the user friendlist.
  2. to loop onto each friend and to make one request for each of them in order to retrieve their photos. IF the amount of photos is not less than 5000, it means that the user still have some photos to show. You'll then have to make another request while incrementing the OFFSET by 5000!

Now you are sure to get all the user friends photos! Also, having this procedure cut up into multiple smaller requests is not a bad thing; you'll be able to know the progress of the query which you can render as a progress bar in AJAX for example. It might be a good thing because it will take a lot of time!

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Thank you for the detailed answer, much appreciated :) –  Nippysaurus Mar 10 '13 at 21:36
    
Yeah it does take a while. My original method was taking 10 minutes which is just, well, not happening :) I was doing something similar to what you suggest which was taking about 2 minutes, which is still a bit long but might be the best solution. –  Nippysaurus Mar 10 '13 at 22:41
    
Try to keep the user informed of the progress! Otherwise he might get bored. But 2 minutes for that much data is ok, yes. –  Stéphane Bruckert Mar 10 '13 at 22:49
    
Most certainly :) –  Nippysaurus Mar 11 '13 at 1:24
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