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Trying to use is_class in the following segment (stripped down from a larger one), but it doesn't seem to work. What's wrong?

#include <type_traits>

template<typename U, typename = void>
struct xxxU_Impl
{
    static void xxxU_push (const U& value);
};

template<typename U> void xxxU_push (const U& value) { xxxU_Impl<U>::xxxU_push (value); }

template<typename U>
struct xxxU_Impl<U *, typename std::enable_if<std::is_class<U>::value>::type>
{
    static void xxxU_push (const U *& value) { }
};

class Foo
{
public:
    int mFoo;
};

int main () {
    Foo * pFoo = new Foo;

    xxxU_push<Foo *>(pFoo);
}

This is with gcc v4.7.2 on cygwin with gcc -std=c++11 test.cpp command line.

The output is:

test.cpp: In instantiation of 'void xxxU_push(const U&) [with U = Foo*]':
test.cpp:26:23:   required from here
test.cpp:9:63: error: no matching function for call to 'xxxU_Impl<Foo*, void>::xxxU_push(Foo* const&)'
test.cpp:9:63: note: candidate is:
test.cpp:14:17: note: static void xxxU_Impl<U*, typename std::enable_if<std::is_class<_Tp>::value>::type>::xxxU_push(const U*&) [with U = Foo]
test.cpp:14:17: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from 'Foo* const' to 'const Foo*&'

**

Update

:** Here's the modified code with annotations which IMHO show that the types are now identical. Still, I'm getting a compile error.

#include <type_traits>

template<typename U, typename = void>
struct xxxU_Impl
{
    static void xxxU_push (const U  & value);   // U=Foo*:  const Foo* & value ==
                                                //          Foo const * & value
};

template<typename U> void xxxU_push (const U  & value)  // U=Foo*:  const Foo* & value ==
                                                        //          Foo const * & value
{ xxxU_Impl<U>::xxxU_push (value); }

template<typename U>
struct xxxU_Impl<U *, typename std::enable_if<std::is_class<U>::value>::type>
{
    static void xxxU_push (U const * & value) { }   // U=Foo:   Foo const * & value
};

class Foo
{
public:
    int mFoo;
};

int main () {
    Foo* pFoo = new Foo;

    xxxU_push<Foo*>(pFoo);
}

What's wrong?

Thx, D

PS A similar scheme with is_enum works w/o a hitch.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The std::is_class<> trait is working fine, and the compiler is pretty much telling you what the problem is:

test.cpp:14:17: note: no known conversion for argument 1 from Foo* const to const Foo*&

You are invoking your function template this way:

xxxU_push<Foo *>(pFoo);

Which means that U will be Foo*. Now the function signature:

template<typename U>
void xxxU_push (const U& value)

Is equivalent to this:

template<typename U>
void xxxU_push (U const& value)

And after replacing Foo* for U you get this:

void xxxU_push (Foo* const& value)

Therefore, value is a constant reference to a pointer to a Foo. Inside the function, you instantiate your class template this way:

xxxU_Impl<U>::xxxU_push (value);

Which is, when substituting Foo* for U again:

xxxU_Impl<Foo*>::xxxU_push (value);

Now your class template specialization is defined this way:

template<typename U>
struct xxxU_Impl<U *, typename std::enable_if<std::is_class<U>::value>::type>
{
    static void xxxU_push (const U *& value) { }
};

If you are instantiating it with Foo* as a template argument, U will be deduced to be Foo, which is a class type. Therefore, your class template gets instantiated without failures (not sure this is what you want, but this is definitely what happens), and in particular the xxxU_push() function gets instantiated this way:

 static void xxxU_push (const Foo *& value) { }

Which is equivalent to this:

 static void xxxU_push (Foo const*& value) { }

Can you see the difference? On the calling site you have a constant reference to a non-constant pointer, here you have a non-constant reference to a constant pointer! These two types are different, and the compiler complains that it cannot convert the argument.

You could fix your error, for instance, by changing the signature of xxxU_push() as follows:

static void xxxU_push (U * const& value) { }
//                     ^^^^^^^^^^

After this change, you can see the whole thing compiling here.

UPDATE:

As a follow-up from the comments, it turns out you necessarily want the static member function xxxU_push() to accept a pointer to const:

 static void xxxU_push (Foo const*& value) { }

In this case, you will have to make a decision: you cannot pass a Foo* to a function which accepts a non-constant reference to a const pointer. You can, however, drop the reference:

 static void xxxU_push (Foo const* value) { }

This is a first possibility to make your program compile. The second possibility is to change the call site so that it provides a pointer to const:

int main () {
    Foo * pFoo = new Foo;
    Foo const* pConstFoo = pFoo;
    xxxU_Impl<Foo*>::xxxU_push(pConstFoo);
//                             ^^^^^^^^^
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thx for the explanation. Since I want the parameter to be a variable pointer to a constant value passed by reference, I changed the implementation when the type is a class to: static void xxxU_push (U const * & value) { }. This now, following your logic, is identical to the calling signature. Still I'm, getting an error that no known conversion for argument 1 from 'Foo* const' to 'const Foo*&' –  qwer1304 Mar 10 '13 at 13:08
    
@qwer1304: Your comment got cut. Anyway, I'm glad this helped! –  Andy Prowl Mar 10 '13 at 13:10
    
Not entirely; see the comment tail above. –  qwer1304 Mar 10 '13 at 13:12
    
@qwer1304: Of course, because U const*& is the same as const U*&. You have just changed the place of const, but not the type. Those two things are equivalent, so it makes sense that you are having the same trouble as before. If you want a pointer to const, then you need to change the calling function so that the proper type is passed –  Andy Prowl Mar 10 '13 at 13:14
    
@qwer1304: See the update to my answer –  Andy Prowl Mar 10 '13 at 13:24

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