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I have a stack class with members and a function called push.

class STACK
{
    int data;
    public:
    void push(int x)
    {
        data=x;
    }
}

What does C++ do to convert this statement:

s1.push(3);

to

s1.push(this,3);

Basically my question is what happens under the hood to generate the this pointer and pass it as a hidden argument?

I am actually coding in C. My objective is to have a program which is as close to OOP as possible. For this i have function pointers as members of the structure. Therefore, I want to know if it is possible to somehow have track of which structure called the function (like a "this" pointer ). I don't want to do something like: s1.push(&s1,3); because it beats my purpose.

IS IT possible to convert s1.push(3); to s1.push(&1,3); via MACRO substitution

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6 Answers 6

There is no magic

s1.push(3);

is just syntax for

STACK::push(&s1, 3);
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Well, the "magic" here is that push(...) becomes a plain (i.e. C-type) function with an additional STACK* parameter. To avoid name clashes with other plain functions, internally the name is "mangled" to include the class name as well among other things. –  TaZ Mar 10 '13 at 12:42
    
...and things get a bit more complicated when methods become virtual ;) –  cubuspl42 Mar 10 '13 at 12:45
1  
The question was about the magic of this, and there is no magic for this, it's just the address of the object used. I do know about the magic of making STACK::push do the right thing. –  Thomas Mar 10 '13 at 12:56
    
IS IT possible to convert s1.push(3); to s1.push(&1,3); via MACRO substitution –  Darshan Shah Mar 10 '13 at 14:23
    
I'm not sure I understand what you mean by MACRO substition, but in a limited sense you can do something simmilar. See C with Pseudo-Classes. –  Thomas Mar 10 '13 at 15:08

First things first! The statement:

s1.push(3);

is NOT translated to:

 s1.push(this, 3);

But to something like this:

STACK::push(&s1, 3); 

Where STACK::push may be treated as global/namespace or static function under class/namespace STACK, whose prototype would be:

push(STACK const* pThis, int arg);

The this pointer is always the first argument to the method (function). If method has zero argument, it will still have one argument (the this pointer of class).

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is it possible to achieve this via coding?? (i mean explicitly converting to push(STACK const* pThis, int arg); ) –  Darshan Shah Mar 10 '13 at 12:46
    
The obvious question is WHY. Why do you want to do that? May be you could write a global or static function and pass pointer of class. –  Ajay Mar 10 '13 at 12:47
    
Yes. But then you might as well just code in C. –  TaZ Mar 10 '13 at 12:47
    
I am actually coding in C. My objective is to have a program which is as close to OOP as possible. For this i have function pointers as members of the structure. Therefore, I want to know if it is possible to somehow have track of which structure called the function (like a "this" pointer ). I dont want to do something like: s1.push(&s1,3); because it beats my purpose. –  Darshan Shah Mar 10 '13 at 12:52
    
Well, you're out of luck. C does not have great facilities for OO programming. You need to explicitly pass the address of the object that your function is supposed to work on. –  us2012 Mar 10 '13 at 12:54
this = &s1

The address of s1 is known, so it can be passed to STACK::push. It's that simple :)

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i totally agree. But the line of code is s1.push(3); how does it become s1.push(this,3); –  Darshan Shah Mar 10 '13 at 12:38
2  
Man, compiler is not a hello world program. "But the line of code is s1.push(3)" is not an argument. Compiler does a lot much more difficult tasks than passing hidden parameters. –  cubuspl42 Mar 10 '13 at 12:39
    
@DarshanShah: in the same way that the code int main(){} turns into an executable file in your file system: because that's what the compiler does. –  jalf Mar 10 '13 at 14:04

C++ does not exactly convert statements (because C++ is a language specification, and you could implement that language in many ways, even -unethically- with a population of slaves working on paper; you don't need a computer, even if you want one, to have C++). The compiler (e.g. GCC) translates the statement to some other lower level representations. With GCC, it is Gimple statements, and the Gimple representation can be examined, e.g. with MELT's probe or -fdump-tree-gimple and other options (like -fdump-tree-all or -fdump-tree-ssa etc...)

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Unfortunately, you have to specify the pointer explicitly or implicitly in C.

For C++, it is the compiler's responsibility to set the implicit this pointer as the argument for a class member function. In your code, the member function is mangled as void STACK::push(STACK*, int) in compilation automatically by the compiler, then, when the member function STACK::push is called, the compiler will set the object address (this) as an argument (generally the 1st one) to the member function STACK::push.

No C compiler will offer above functions, thus, it's the users responsibility to set the pointer.

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After your edit, the question takes up another problem - OOP in C. That's difficult and type-unsafe, but possible to implement. You can look at GObject library, which provides object system in C. I guess it makes heavy use of macros.

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