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The amount of time it takes to completely serialize the DBMDL (to finish "Your project will be available after 10000 operations are completed) is becoming a hindrance to productivity.

I've done what I can to optimize disk activity (excluding my personal TEMP folder from the virus scanner, along with my local source repository). Short of getting a SSD I'm not sure what else I can do along those lines.

I believe it has something to do with how the project is organized. The finished DBMDL file is roughly 150MB. Others throughout our organization do not seem to have this issue.

Anyone had to deal with this?

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I guess we are answering each others questions. :) –  Raj More Oct 7 '09 at 15:26
    
Indeed. Too bad neither of us know how to speed it up :). –  Nicolas Webb Oct 7 '09 at 15:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I strongly recommend upgrading to VS2010. First off, the building of the model happens in the background and doesn't interfere. Second, it finishes in a fraction of the time. There are many other reasons to upgrade as well, but performance is the killer feature for me.

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This is what we are doing. Thanks! –  Nicolas Webb Aug 9 '10 at 18:25

I have dealt with this over and over again. Unless you compile and save your solution just before you close it, the next time you open it up, it will lock you up. I used to have about 90K operations pending. It got to a point that I started making coffee runs just to get away.

Also, I stopped closing down VS2008.

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Take a look at this forum post.

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/vstsdb/thread/5f5fa150-c015-43a3-ab59-77737fdfb820

They indicate that performance is much better in vs2010

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Any way you can justify an upgrade is a good one but in the meantime you might take a look at your master.dbschema file. Trimming out all the fluff contained in this file shaved quite a bit of time off of my builds with relatively little effort (30 minutes?). The article below has the info you need.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/bahill/archive/2009/03/23/right-sizing-the-master-dbschema-file-for-better-design-time-performance.aspx

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I'll take a look - thanks! –  Nicolas Webb Sep 14 '10 at 19:30

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