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I have the following JavaScript and jQuery, which works perfectly:

function updateTaskTypes(taskTypes) {

    $.each(taskTypes, function (idx, e) {

        var contains = $("#async_TaskTypes").find("a:contains('" + e + "')").length > 0;

        if (!contains) {

            var html = "<li><a href=\"#tab" + idx + "\">" + e + "</a></li>";

            $("#async_TaskTypes").append(html);
        }
    });
}

The above code takes an array of strings. The aim is to add an <li> to #async_TaskTypes if it doesn't already contain one.

The format of the HTML is:

<ul id="async_TaskTypes" class="tabs">
    <li><a href="#tab0">Preview Blog Comment</a></li>
    <li><a href="#tab1">Respond To Contact Us</a></li>
</ul>

My problem is the jQuery doesn't seem as efficient as it could be. Is there a way to make the above code more efficient?

By 'efficient', I mean perhaps there is a more direct jQuery function I could use, or a cleaner algorithm etc... Basically more elegant code.

share|improve this question
    
It's not at all clear what you mean with "efficient". More memory-efficient? More cpu-efficient? Or more elegant code? – Philipp Mar 10 '13 at 15:56
    
@Philipp Thanks. I have updated my question – rhughes Mar 10 '13 at 15:57
    
Why don't you add an ID for task types to the li's instead of searching the text. – ryan Mar 10 '13 at 15:59
up vote 2 down vote accepted

A search in the DOM is always inefficient. You should have a model where you store which tasks are already on the shown list, so that you can simply search trough that with array methods (and if sorted, even possible in O(n)). This could do it, for example:

function updateTaskTypes(taskTypes) {
    var $ul = $("#async_TaskTypes"),
        texts = $ul.find("a").map(function(){
            return $(this).text();
        }).get();
    $.each(taskTypes, function (idx, e) {
        if ($.inArray(texts, e) == -1)
            $ul.append("<li><a href=\"#tab" + idx + "\">" + e + "</a></li>");
    });
}

Or you just remove all list items and reappend the whole task list, which is much simpler and might be even faster for short lists:

function updateTaskTypes(taskTypes) {
    var $ul = $("#async_TaskTypes").empty();
    $.each(taskTypes, function (idx, e) {
        $ul.append("<li><a href=\"#tab" + idx + "\">" + e + "</a></li>");
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is good if you want the list always to reflect the order of taskTypes (or some custom sort thereof). If however you wanted newly introduced items always to appear at the end of the list (and a custom sort could not do the job), then a different approach is required (eg as in the question, or by maintaining an appropriately-keyed js object of booleans and using it for lookup). – Beetroot-Beetroot Mar 10 '13 at 16:33
    
@Beetroot: Exactly. I expected this since the index in the array is used as an identifier, but for the other possibility I've added a script as well (not with a fancy hashmap, though :-) – Bergi Mar 10 '13 at 16:45
1  
There are so many variations on this one, the OP's problem is too much choice! – Beetroot-Beetroot Mar 10 '13 at 19:32

Or you can actually just use a regular expression:

var a = $("#async_TaskTypes").html();
if( /Whatever/g.test(a) ) {
  //this string is present in your html
}
share|improve this answer
    
That would be really slow I think. – Zoltan.Tamasi Mar 10 '13 at 16:15
    
@Sylvanus: Why? The DOM is only queried once, and regex is fast. Only it might not be as reliable as contains, which looks through the text() of the single elements. – Bergi Mar 10 '13 at 16:21
    
Because it searches through the whole inner text of the #async_TaskTypes, nost just the <a> elements. – Zoltan.Tamasi Mar 10 '13 at 16:25
    
@Sylvanus: Yet there's not much text outside the <a> elements, is it? And of course, you could narrow it down to $.map($("#async_TaskTypes a"), function(){return $(this).text();}).join("\n") – Bergi Mar 10 '13 at 16:29

Updating Bergi's answer:

function updateTaskTypes(taskTypes) {
    var $ul = $("#async_TaskTypes").empty();
    $.each(taskTypes, function (idx, e) { 
        $ul.append(
            $("<li>").append(
                $("<href>", {id: "tab" + idx}).text(e)
            );
        );
    });
}

Maybe a little bit more elegant.

share|improve this answer
    
If you're doing it that way, you should use .text() instead of .html() as well. – Bergi Mar 10 '13 at 16:26
    
You're right. I changed it. – Zoltan.Tamasi Mar 10 '13 at 16:28

Another idea:

var async_TaskTypes = $("#async_TaskTypes");
async_TaskTypes.append(
    $.map(taskTypes, function (idx, e) {
        if (!async_TaskTypes.has("a:contains('" + e + "')")) {
            return $("<li>").append(
                $("<href>", {id: "tab" + idx}).text(e)
            );
        }
    })
);
share|improve this answer

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