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I am reading buffer bytes from a socket but I don't know how to initialize the buffer array with the length info.

uint32_t len;
int lengthbytes = 0;
int databytes = 0;

// receive the length info of an image data
lengthbytes = recv(clientSocket, (char *)&len, sizeof(len), 0);

// convert hexadecimal data to length in bytes
len = ntohl(len);

// ????? how to initialize the buffer array with the length info ????
char buf[len];   -----> this is illegal in C  

// read the image data 
databytes = recv(clientSocket, buf, sizeof(buf), 0);
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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you declare buf you declare a variable length array. This is legal in C (from the C99 standard) but illegal in C++. In C++ you can instead use std::vector:

std::vector<char> buf(len);

You can use this vector in the call to recv as well:

databytes = recv(clientSocket, &buf[0], buf.size(), 0);

To use the vector inside a loop, you have two choices:

  1. Declare the variable outside the loop, and use clear and resize when needed:

    std::vector<char> buf;
    
    // ...
    
    for (int i = 0; i < number_of_images; i++)
    {
        std::cout << "Fetching image #" << (i + 1) << '\n';
    
        // Get the image length
        size_t length = get_image_length();
    
        buf.clear();  // Clear the buffer
        buf.resize(length);  // Set the size to the image length
    
        // Receive the image
        databytes = recv(clientSocket, &buf[0], buf.size(), 0);
    }
    
  2. Declare the vector to be local inside the loop:

    for (int i = 0; i < number_of_images; i++)
    {
        std::cout << "Fetching image #" << (i + 1) << '\n';
    
        // Get the image length
        size_t length = get_image_length();
    
        std::vector<char> buf(length);
    
        // Receive the image
        databytes = recv(clientSocket, &buf[0], buf.size(), 0);
    }
    
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if I want to use while loop to receive many images, how do I delete the content of buf at the end of each loop? –  boogiedoll Mar 12 '13 at 11:45
    
@boogiedoll Please see my updated answer. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 12 '13 at 12:18
    
great! thanks :) –  boogiedoll Mar 12 '13 at 13:47
len = ntohl(len);
char buf[len];  //----> this is illegal in C  

This is valid in C99 and it is called a variable length array. If you are not using C99 use malloc to allocate the array (and declare buf as a char *).

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You have to use dynamic memory allocation;

char* buf = new char[len];

If you're done using buf, don't forget to call delete to free the memory.

delete[] buf;
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Please allocate the buffer through malloc i.e. buf = malloc(sizeof(char) * len);

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You can do it with new or malloc. Don't forget to delete the buffer when done!

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You can use an std::vector<char>, and then use it's data() as an array buffer:

#include <vector>
std::vector<char> buf(len);
databytes = recv(clientSocket, buf.data(), buf.size(), 0); // access underlying char array
databytes = recv(clientSocket, &buf[0], buf.size(), 0);    // as above, C++03 version
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I wrote a class called tempbuf precisely for this purpose in C++.

You can find it here:
small_lib.cpp
small_lib.h

These two files are MIT-licensed, so you can use it anyway you like.

How to use this class?

tempbuf buf(len);
databytes = recv(clientSocket, buf.get(), buf.size(), 0); // if you want char* returned
databytes = recv(clientSocket, buf.constchar(), buf.size(), 0); // if you want constchar* returned

And guess why I wrote this class? You don't need to delete or deallocate the dynamically allocated memory because it is done in the destructor of the class.

Why didn't I use std::auto_ptr? Because from my understanding, that's only for non-arrays as in it supports new X but not new X[10].

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