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I came across use of find command in an example as follows (it copies the directory structure some where)

 find olddir -name script.sh -printf "%p\0" -printf "newdir/%P\0" | xargs -0L2 cp -n

I am not clear with difference between %p and %P I read the man page of find which does not says much

 %p     File's name.
 %P     File's name with the name of the command line argument under which it was found removed.

what is the difference between %p and %P

I am confused with what it means by

 %P     File's name with the name of the command line argument under which it was found removed.
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1 Answer 1

Did you even try it? The %p, in your example, prints the file including the olddir part, and %P prints it without. Pretty much exactly what the documentation says. Simple example:

$ ls -R
.:
dir/

./dir:
file
$ find dir -name file -printf '%p\n'
dir/file
$ find dir -name file -printf '%P\n'
file
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I am unable to understand your explanation also –  Registered User Mar 10 '13 at 17:04
1  
I added an example. I still don't understand why you didn't try it. –  Carl Norum Mar 10 '13 at 17:07
    
I get your point let me be more specific I have tried what I got confused with is the language used in man page of find which says ` File's name with the name of the command line argument under which it was found removed.` because in %p it says file name in both cases it is printing file name only in one case with directory name and in one case without directory name so are file names of two types –  Registered User Mar 10 '13 at 17:14
    
Well in my example, the file's name is dir/file, and the command line argument was dir, so that leaves just file. Same goes for your example. –  Carl Norum Mar 10 '13 at 17:15

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