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#include <stdio.h>

main()
{
    int i,l,t=1,m,a[15]={0};
    for(i=0;i<15;i++)
    {  
        scanf("%d",&a[i]);
    }

    for(i=0;i<15;i++)
    {
        if(a[i]>=3 && a[i]<=8)
        {
            for(l=i+1;l<15;l++)
            {
                if(a[i]>a[l])
                {
                    m=a[i];
                    a[i]=a[l];
                    a[l]=m;
                }
            }
            printf(" No%d \t %d \n",t++,a[i]);
        }
    }
    system("pause");
}

In this code in c i want to print the elements of an array in an ascending order but the value of the elements must be bewteen 3 and 8. The results that i get exclude the values over 8 but they include the values under 3.Why does this happen? Thanks in advance.

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closed as not a real question by casperOne Mar 11 '13 at 12:08

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
My eyes, your formatting is terrible. Please fix – Tony The Lion Mar 10 '13 at 17:40
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suggest that you do the sorting separately, then just print the elements between 3 and 8, then you will get it in the order you would want.

// sort the array
for(i=0;i<15;i++)
{
    for(l=i+1;l<15;l++)
    {
        if(a[i]>a[l])
        {
            m=a[i];
            a[i]=a[l];
            a[l]=m;
        }
    }
}

for (i = 0; i < 15; i++)
{
    if (a[i] < 3)
        continue;

    if (a[i] > 8)
        break;

    printf(" No%d \t %d \n",t++,a[i]);
}

EDIT: modified print loop

share|improve this answer
1  
If array is sorted you can have a better loop for printing i.e. lesser iterations in some cases, ignore till a[i] is >= 3, then print only till a[i] is <=8 – another.anon.coward Mar 10 '13 at 17:51
    
yes. i've changed the code. I could have iterated till a[i] < 3 outside the main loop, this would avoid that check later on, but I think that would be called premature optimization. So I've left that – Ahmed Aeon Axan Mar 10 '13 at 17:56
    
True! :) ... Was just making an observation thats all – another.anon.coward Mar 10 '13 at 17:58
    
Thank you all very much for the quick answers :) .It was so simple but i tend to make things complicated and not think clearly.Also i am sorry for the formatting. – user2154323 Mar 10 '13 at 18:09
    
I always keep in mind that often the simplest solution is the best solution :) – Ahmed Aeon Axan Mar 10 '13 at 18:10

It looks like you are running some kind of a sorting algorithm in there, but you skip all elements between 3 and 8.

The reason you see numbers under 3 printed is because your printf is after the loop that does swapping: by the time the inner loop is finished, a number that's smaller than a[i] may be inserted at i-th position. If you move printf before the loop, the numbers printed will all be from the [3..8] range, inclusive of both ends.

share|improve this answer

Your outer loop excludes both 3 and 8 from your sort:

for(i=0;i<15;i++)
{
    if(a[i]>=3 && a[i]<=8) /* <--- exclusion here */
    {
        /* code nested in outer loop and exclusion */
    }
}

However, your inner loop has no such exclusion:

for(l=i+1;l<15;l++)
{
    if(a[i]>a[l]) /* <--- no exclusion! */
    {
        m=a[i];
        a[i]=a[l];
        a[l]=m;
    }
}

I suggest modifying your inner loop to exclude values below 3 from it's search:

for(l=i+1;l<15;l++)
{
    if(a[l]>=3 && a[i]>a[l])
    {
        m=a[i];
        a[i]=a[l];
        a[l]=m;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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