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Say I have a function that should accept any number of parameters, so what im coing here is declaring no prototype, and letting the function to be created when it is called in the code. I am using a pointer to void to receive the random number of parametersparameters, however, when doing this, the reference to the memory addres of the first parameter is the only thing that is passed, so for it to work, i would have to declare variables in the same order that i am going to call them in the code:

unsigned char result=0;
unsigned char a=1; 
unsigned char b=2;
unsigned char c=3;

char main (void)
{
    for (;;)
    {
        result = function (&a, &b, &c);
        result = function (&c, &b, &a);
    }
}

function (void *vPointer)
{
    return (1);
}

Also I am declaring function without a type since it would not match the call (where it is implicitly declared also).

The result here is a reference to the first parameter sent in the function, so if i point to the next addres in the first function call, it would work, but in the second call, it gets the reference to c, and whatever memory is ahead of where it is placed.

Anyone know a way of sorting the parameters references the correct way? or an effective way to receive an unknown number of parameters in a function?

NOTE: (...) argument SHALL NOT be used.

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1  
you probably want this C/C++: Passing variable number of arguments around –  Jens Gustedt Mar 10 '13 at 18:09
    
... is not a library. It is part of the language. Use it! Or use some other language (no suggestions though). –  pmg Mar 10 '13 at 18:11
    
If you define a function with no explicit return type, it's exactly the same as defining it with a return type of int. Unless you're using a compiler that conforms to C99 or later, in which case the return type is not optional. Just define your function with a return type of int. If you assign the result to an unsigned char, it will be implicitly converted. –  Keith Thompson Mar 10 '13 at 18:18
    
It does use the library stdargs. Your compiler may let you use it without including the library explicitly but that is because most compilers have an implicit include of all C standard libraries. –  RobertoNovelo Mar 10 '13 at 18:18
1  
@RobertoNovelo: You are simply wrong about that. The , ... syntax is part of the C language, and has been since 1989. Try it yourself. –  Keith Thompson Mar 10 '13 at 18:26

4 Answers 4

All C functions should have prototypes. They're not actually mandatory, but there's no good reason not to use them (unless you're stuck with a pre-ANSI compiler that doesn't support them). (But see the bottom of this answer.)

If you want a function that takes a variable number of arguments, that prototype should end with , ..., and the function itself should use the <stdarg.h> mechanism to process its arguments. (This requires at least one argument with a defined type; that argument is used as an anchor for the following arguments.) It's documented here and elsewhere.

As I was typing this, you updated your question with "NOTE: No libraries (such as (...) )should be used". <stdarg.h> is one of the handful headers that's required for all conforming C implementations, including freestanding (embedded) ones -- because it doesn't define any functions, just types and macros. Your C implementation should support it. If it doesn't, then it's not a conforming C implementation, and you'll need to tell us exactly what compiler you're using and/or read its documentation to find out how it handles variadic functions, or an equivalent.

If you really can't use , ... and <stdarg.h>, (or perhaps the older <varargs.h>), then you can define your function with a fixed number of arguments, enough for all uses, then have callers pass extra null pointers.

EDIT:

This is an update based on new information in comments and chat.

The OP has a homework assignment to implement printf for some TI microcontroller, for some reason not using either the , ... notation or <stdarg.h>. The compiler in question apparently implements C89/C90, so it does support both features; this is an arbitrary restriction.

This information should have been in the question, which is why I'm downvoting it until the OP updates it.

There is no portable way to achieve this -- which is exactly why , ... is part of the standard language, and <stdarg.h> is part of the standard library.

Probably the best approach would be to write a program that uses , ... and <stdarg.h>, then invoke the compiler so it shows just the output of the preprocessor (resolving the various va_* macros and the va_list type), and then imitate that. And you'd have to assume, or verify using the compiler documentation, that the calling convention for variadic and non-variadic functions is compatible. In other words, find out what this particular implementation does, and reinvent a similar wheel.

(I hope that the point of the homework assignment is to demonstrate how much better the standard techniques are.)

UPDATE 2:

I wrote above that all C functions should have prototypes. This may actually be a rare exception to this rule. At least one of these calls:

printf("Hello\n");
printf("x = %d\n", 42);

must produce a diagnostic from a conforming compiler unless either printf is declared with , ... (which is forbidden by the homework assignment), or there is no visible prototype for printf. If there's no prototype, then at least one of the calls will have undefined behavior (behavior that's not defined by the C standard, though it may be defined by a particular compiler).

In effect, to meet the homework requirements, you'll have to pretend that you're using a pre-ANSI C compiler.

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1  
functions do not NEED prototypes, they can be left out, and the compiler will guess the prototype in the call. If the implementation does not match the function call, you get a compiler error. –  RobertoNovelo Mar 10 '13 at 18:12
    
@RobertoNovelo: Prototypes aren't required by the language, but if you have a that conforms to the 1989 standard or later, it almost never makes sense not to use them. Non-prototyped function declarations and definitions were retained in the language only for compatibility with pre-ANSI code. –  Keith Thompson Mar 10 '13 at 18:15
    
@RobertoNovelo: And compilers do not "guess" the function type for given call; they follow specific rules given in the language standard. If a call doesn't match a function definition, and there's no visible prototype, compilers typically don't produce error messages; you just get misbehaving code. Always use prototypes, unless you have a very good and specific reason not to. –  Keith Thompson Mar 10 '13 at 18:26

the only "clean" way to use functions with variable arguments is to use variadic functions:

#include <stdarg.h>

void myfun(int foo, ...) {
       va_list ap;
       va_start(foo, ap);
       // ...
       va_end(ap);
}

you will need to make sure that you know which arguments you actually expect (usually you either use your first argument to indicate how many (and which) arguments to expect (examples are an int that says "now come arguments", or a format-string like "%d %s:%s", that says now come an int and two char*), or you use a a final terminating argument (e.g. read arguments until you encounter NULL).

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You could use an array of variable length:

unsigned char result=0;
unsigned char a=1; 
unsigned char b=2;
unsigned char c=3;

function (int len, void *vPointer);

int main (void)
{
    for (;;)
    {
        unsigned char args[3];
        args[0] = a;
        args[1] = b;
        args[2] = c;
        result = function (3, args);
        args[0] = c;
        args[1] = b;
        args[2] = a;
        result = function (3, args);
    }
    return 0;
}

function (int len, void *vPointer)
{
    return (1);
}

But I recommend you use the standard way instead, i.e. variadic functions.

//jk

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The thing is, that the function call shall not declare the lenght of the parameters sent. The idea is to do something like a List, and go through the reference received in the function until I find a NULL the way you suggest it. –  RobertoNovelo Mar 10 '13 at 18:26
    
The compiler can't guess how many parameters you send to the function when it generates code for your function. So in this case you have to invent your own method to handle this yourself, i.e. you have to send it as a parameter or global variable or whatever. –  j.karlsson Mar 10 '13 at 18:31
    
@RobertoNovelo: Are you asking how to implement a linked list? –  Keith Thompson Mar 10 '13 at 18:38
    
No, i want to know how to implement the variable arguments, and the way im going right now is trying to use a linked list. –  RobertoNovelo Mar 10 '13 at 18:41

You can use a structure:-

typedef struct _Params {
   int m_a;
   int m_b;
   int m_c;
} Params;

Then your parameters can't get mixed up. Just as more letters up to the max you need.

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