Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Tables:

  • Classes (class, type, country, numGuns, bore, displacement)
  • Ships (name, class, launched)
  • Outcome (ship, battle, result)

Question:

Find for each class the number of ships of that class that sunk in battle.

My answer:

  SELECT ships.class, COUNT(*)
  FROM ships, outcome
  WHERE ships.name = outcomes.ship AND outcome.result = 'sunk'
  GROUP BY ships.class

Answer with join:

  SELECT class, COUNT(*)
  from ships
  inner join outcomes
  on name = ship 
  where outcome.result = 'sunk'
  group by class

Answer given in sample booklet:

  SELECT classes.class, COUNT(*)
  FROM classes, ships, outcomes
  WHERE classes.class = ships.class AND ship = name AND result = 'sunk'
  GROUP BY classes.class;

What I don't get is why did they have to include the classes table, isn't my query sufficient? I'm doing the same thing but not joining on the classes table. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
4  
What is this "Sample Booklet" you are reading that has SQL Queries with syntax that is 20 years out of date? – RBarryYoung Mar 10 '13 at 18:18
    
Your query is correct but can be improved upon by joining your tables – Dan Bracuk Mar 10 '13 at 18:23
    
@RBarryYoung Dunno I got sample questions online. These are some slides by a TA..Hasn't mentioned the date. – user1071840 Mar 10 '13 at 18:26
    
@DanBracuk Thank you, will look at the join. – user1071840 Mar 10 '13 at 18:27
    
@DanBracuk I updated the question with join. Is that still correct? – user1071840 Mar 10 '13 at 18:32

The only real difference is that if there is a Class with no ships, the provided answer will include a row for it, where as your query would not.

Oops, sorry, I misread the sample answer initially. There is no real difference between them.


It's also worth noting that this syntax:

SELECT classes.class, COUNT(*)
FROM classes, ships, outcomes
WHERE classes.class = ships.class AND ship = name AND result = 'sunk'
GROUP BY classes.class;

is archaic and deprecated. This is the preferred modern syntax:

SELECT classes.class, COUNT(*)
FROM classes
INNER JOIN ships    ON classes.class = ships.class
INNER JOIN outcomes ON outcomes.ship = ships.name
WHERE  outcomes.result = 'sunk'
GROUP BY classes.class;
share|improve this answer
    
Meaning, the (old-fashioned) equi-join syntax (WHERE tableA.fk = tableB.pk) always performs an OUTER JOIN? – stakx Mar 10 '13 at 18:21
    
@stakx No, the old syntax would perform an inner join if = was used or an outer join if =* or *= was used. – RBarryYoung Mar 10 '13 at 18:24
    
@stakx Oops, I see what you meant. No my initial answer is incorrect. I will correct... – RBarryYoung Mar 10 '13 at 18:25
    
I had initially misread the sample answer in the old syntax. Ironically, I got it right when I re-conjugated it into modern syntax. – RBarryYoung Mar 10 '13 at 18:31

There is no real difference in both queries. There can be difference if you remove group by and count from select. Because there can be more than one same ship names in different classes. Since you are using group by class then it doesn't make any difference in both queries. Both queries will return ships count per class.

share|improve this answer

This would be a good question to ask of your TA (Teaching Assistant?). There may be "teaching" reasons why the answer in your book was used.

Although your query and the one from the book will produce the same result, your query cannot be easily modified to answer other questions about "classes". For example, suppose the question changes to "How many ships were sunk for each country?". A simple change to the "book query" makes that easy (using RBarryYoung's re-formatted code):

SELECT classes.country, COUNT(*)
FROM classes
INNER JOIN ships    ON classes.class = ships.class
INNER JOIN outcomes ON outcomes.ship = ships.name
WHERE  outcomes.result = 'sunk'
GROUP BY classes.country;

It may be a subtle point, but start queries with the table you are "most interested in" as the FROM clause and then join to other related tables as needed. That at least makes your code easier to read.

share|improve this answer

Your query doesn't list EACH classes only those where boat sunk this is a bit better but seems still incorrect:

select class, sum(sunks) as sunks from(
    select class, sum(case result when 'sunk' then 1 else 0 end) as sunks 
    from classes c left join outcomes o on c.class = o.ship
    group by class
    union all
    select class, sum(case result when 'sunk' then 1 else 0 end) as sunks
    from ships s left join outcomes o on s.name = o.ship
    group by class
)as x
group by class
share|improve this answer

I would vote up Kaczmarski as it was very close. The answer that works has one additional line to pass the error check on second pass.

There needs to be a check to make sure the ships.name does not include a name which is also the class name.

An efficient database structure would include the Bismarck and all ships that were sunk in the outcomes table and also in the ships table. Or the ships table would contain none of the ships that were sunk.

This type of method must be used in a real world scenario in which a database is being modified by multiple users and a user has read access to a table that is being modified.

select class, sum(sunks) as sunks from(
    select class, sum(case result when 'sunk' then 1 else 0 end) as sunks 
    from classes c left join outcomes o on c.class = o.ship
where class not in (select name from ships) 
    group by class
    union all
    select class, sum(case result when 'sunk' then 1 else 0 end) as sunks
    from ships s left join outcomes o on s.name = o.ship
    group by class
)as x

group by class
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Your answer is hard to ready. Consider editing it and formatting it appropriately. – Olivier De Meulder Nov 25 '15 at 17:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.