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I would like to place a half black, half white circle of radius R at the origin of a matplotlib plot. I'm aware that there exists a Circle class, but I don't know how to specify that the left half of the circle should be white and the right half should be black. (An ideal solution would allow me to specify the orientation of the circle -- e.g. I should be able to rotate it so that for example the top could be while and the bottom black).

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You should be able to do it with two Wedges, but I'm having trouble getting things to work properly... –  Joe Kington Mar 10 '13 at 19:25
    
@JoeKington -- Uh-oh. If you can't manage to make it work, that's a little discouraging for me ;-) (I've seen some of your matplotlib work here on SO ... It's pretty impressive) –  mgilson Mar 10 '13 at 19:30
    
Thanks! Turns out I was just doing something stupid. Two wedges works perfectly, if you don't add random typos to things! –  Joe Kington Mar 10 '13 at 19:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The easiest way is to use two Wedges. (This doesn't automatically rescale the axes, but that's easy to add, if you'd like.)

As a quick example:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.patches import Wedge

def main():
    fig, ax = plt.subplots()
    dual_half_circle((0.5, 0.5), radius=0.3, angle=90, ax=ax)
    ax.axis('equal')
    plt.show()

def dual_half_circle(center, radius, angle=0, ax=None, colors=('w','k'),
                     **kwargs):
    """
    Add two half circles to the axes *ax* (or the current axes) with the 
    specified facecolors *colors* rotated at *angle* (in degrees).
    """
    if ax is None:
        ax = plt.gca()
    theta1, theta2 = angle, angle + 180
    w1 = Wedge(center, radius, theta1, theta2, fc=colors[0], **kwargs)
    w2 = Wedge(center, radius, theta2, theta1, fc=colors[1], **kwargs)
    for wedge in [w1, w2]:
        ax.add_artist(wedge)
    return [w1, w2]

main()

enter image description here

If you'd like it to always be at the origin, you can specify the transform to be ax.transAxes, and turn clipping off.

E.g.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.patches import Wedge

def main():
    fig, ax = plt.subplots()
    dual_half_circle(radius=0.1, angle=90, ax=ax)
    ax.axis('equal')
    plt.show()

def dual_half_circle(radius, angle=0, ax=None, colors=('w','k'), **kwargs):
    """
    Add two half circles to the axes *ax* (or the current axes) at the lower
    left corner of the axes with the specified facecolors *colors* rotated at
    *angle* (in degrees).
    """
    if ax is None:
        ax = plt.gca()
    kwargs.update(transform=ax.transAxes, clip_on=False)
    center = (0, 0)
    theta1, theta2 = angle, angle + 180
    w1 = Wedge(center, radius, theta1, theta2, fc=colors[0], **kwargs)
    w2 = Wedge(center, radius, theta2, theta1, fc=colors[1], **kwargs)
    for wedge in [w1, w2]:
        ax.add_artist(wedge)
    return [w1, w2]

main()

However, this will make the "circularity" of the circle depend on aspect ratio of the outline of the axes. (You can get around that in a couple of ways, but it gets more complex. Let me know if that's what you had in mind and I can show a more elaborate example.) I also may have misunderstood what you meant "at the origin".

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Yep. That's pretty much what I want. Thanks :) –  mgilson Mar 10 '13 at 19:58
    
Not a problem! Hope it helps! –  Joe Kington Mar 10 '13 at 20:04
    
add_artist does not work for me. I have to use add_patch. This works on 1.4.2 and I've used this on much earlier versions too. –  Kaushik Ghose Apr 29 at 19:20

You can use the unicode half filled circle (U+25D0) if you have a font with this symbol. Oddly, this isn't in STIX (included with matplotlib), but I know it's in DejaVu Sans, so I'll use it from there.

enter image description here

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.font_manager
from numpy import *

path = '/full/path/to/font/DejaVuSans.ttf'
f0 = matplotlib.font_manager.FontProperties()    
f0.set_file(path)

plt.figure()
plt.xlim(-1.2,1.2)
plt.ylim(-1.2,1.2)

for angle in arange(0, 2*pi, 2*pi/10):
    x, y = cos(angle), sin(angle)
    plt.text(x, y, u'\u25D0', fontproperties=f0, rotation=angle*(180/pi), size=30)

plt.show()
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This is neat, but you can't specify the size of the circles in axis units which is what I actually want here. –  mgilson Mar 11 '13 at 18:29

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