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This is a very hard to find word because in most cases they are not sensitive during a search. The best I could find outside of documentation is a test in IRB.

 BEGIN{puts x = 10}
 10
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Many thanks for all your answers. Where or how could I find this in Ruby documentation? The pickax book was a good answer for that reason. –  Douglas G. Allen Mar 10 '13 at 20:46
    
See my updated answer for direct links to documentation –  Mchl Mar 10 '13 at 21:02
    
I can copy and paste too guys. Come on. All I wanted was some reference like the docs and books not your copied code. But thanks for the answers. –  Douglas G. Allen Mar 12 '13 at 1:45
    
Thisx relates to my other question so feel free to answer it. stackoverflow.com/questions/14885418/… –  Douglas G. Allen Mar 12 '13 at 1:49
    
Sheesh, from accepted answer to downvote... Mighty nice of you –  Mchl Mar 12 '13 at 1:58
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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

One thing that hasn't been mentioned is that in earlier versions of Ruby, BEGIN was unconditional:

if false
  BEGIN { puts "Up is down, hot is cold, good is evil!" }
end

If you try that with Ruby 1.8.7, the sentence is printed, even though it's in the branch of if that isn't taken.

Under Ruby 2.0.0, it's a syntax error to use BEGIN outside of the top-level (a much smarter way to handle that):

unconditional.rb:2: BEGIN is permitted only at toplevel
  BEGIN { puts "Up is down, hot is cold, good is evil!" }
       ^

Edit: In a way, nobody has answered the question you raise in your comment: Why does Ruby have BEGIN at all? I'll try. BEGIN comes to Ruby (like many things) from Perl. Perl has it because it existed in awk. It made a ton of sense in awk because by default, an awk file consists of a series of patterns and actions:

/foo/ { print $1 }
/bar/ { print $2 }

Every pattern is checked for every line. If the pattern matches, then the action is performed. Otherwise, awk moves on to the next pattern. So in the mini script above, if the line matches 'foo', then the first field is printed. If the line matches 'bar', then the second field is printed.

But by now you can see the gap that BEGIN (and END) blocks fill: What if you want to do something unconditionally before any intput has been tested or after all the input has been seen (like print a header at the top of your report or print a row of totals at the end of the report)? Normal awk lines of pattern + action can't help you there.

That's why BEGIN and END exist. But I'm not sure how useful they are for modern, idiomatic Ruby scripts. But as dbenhur points out in the comments, you can still use Ruby very well for awk-like one-liners. (I also have a recollection that MiniTest, the standard Ruby testing library, used to use an at_exit function for testing, but I'm not sure it does any longer.)

Two good links about Ruby, awk and Ruby one-liners:

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I'm beginning to see a use for this, Thanks. Let's say you just start writing code without thinking of any order and just letting it flow but then you realize that the order is wrong. Perhaps this would be useful in that sense? Just a thought. Could we ask 'Matz' what he had in mind? Maybe he didn't even do it. Who did then? –  Douglas G. Allen Mar 10 '13 at 21:13
    
@DouglasG.Allen I've updated my answer to try to explain the history of BEGIN and END in Ruby. –  Telemachus Mar 10 '13 at 21:47
1  
"I'm not sure how useful they are for modern, idiomatic Ruby." Ruby still has an awk-mode -an or -ap. It's quite useful for composing awkish cmdline one-liners and often more capable and expressive than awk itself. –  dbenhur Mar 10 '13 at 22:13
    
@dbenhur I agree as far as that goes, but I meant Ruby in script form rather than the one-liners. I'll add that to my answer though, thanks. –  Telemachus Mar 10 '13 at 22:15
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As all keywords BEGIN and END are documented as public instance methods of Object (even though you won't see them returned from Object.public_instance_methods)

BEGIN Designates, via code block, code to be executed unconditionally before sequential execution of the program begins. Sometimes used to simulate forward references to methods.

puts times_3(gets.to_i)

BEGIN {
  def times_3(n)
    n * 3
  end
}

END Designates, via code block, code to be executed just prior to program termination.

END { 
  puts "Bye!" 
}

Some more detailed explanation from Programming Ruby The Pragmatic Programmer's Guide

BEGIN and END Blocks

Every Ruby source file can declare blocks of code to be run as the file is being loaded (the BEGIN blocks) and after the program has finished executing (the END blocks).

BEGIN {   
  begin code 
}

END {
  end code 
}

A program may include multiple BEGIN and END blocks. BEGIN blocks are executed in the order they are encountered. END blocks are executed in reverse order.

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That's a cool answer. +1 to you. –  Arup Rakshit Mar 10 '13 at 19:03
1  
Yes! Thanks. I found it under The Ruby Language chapter and page 303 of the book. This is about the only place that even mentions this and that is just a paragraph. So you see how obscure it is? That is why I'm relying on this site and the web. –  Douglas G. Allen Mar 10 '13 at 21:05
2  
@Douglas Runpaint is doing a good job. –  steenslag Mar 10 '13 at 22:04
    
@DouglasG.Allen It's mentioned in a number of books on Ruby and in a number of web tutorials. But it is damn hard to search for because of case insensitivity problems. –  Telemachus Mar 10 '13 at 22:49
    
+1 for linking to the documentation. –  Andrew Grimm Mar 12 '13 at 21:44
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The BEGIN block is exactly what you may assume, and that is that the block given will run before the rest of the code in your program.

This being an example.

puts "Goodbye cruel world!"

BEGIN {
puts "Hello World!"
}

I hope that helps.

There is a working example of this in a minitest where a collection of values is put out of the way at the end of the file, but evaluated first.

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Good example Victor. May I use this in my wiki about reserved words? –  Douglas G. Allen Mar 10 '13 at 21:14
    
As per the licensing of this site, I would have to guess that you should feel restricted only by that license. –  vgoff Mar 10 '13 at 21:18
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From The Ruby Programming Language:


BEGIN and END Blocks

Every Ruby source file can declare blocks of code to be run as the file is being loaded (the BEGIN blocks) and after the program has finished executing (the END blocks).

BEGIN {
  # begin code
} 
END {
  # end code
}

A program may include multiple BEGIN and END blocks. BEGIN blocks are executed in the order they are encountered. END blocks are executed in reverse order.


So:

$ cat beginend.rb
END { puts :end }
BEGIN { puts :begin }
END { puts :end2 }
BEGIN { puts :begin2 }

puts :run
$ ruby beginend.rb 
begin
begin2
run
end2
end
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the BEGIN/END is really handy when using the -e option to process a stream. For example, to total a file of numbers:

cat <<EOF > numbers
1
5 
10
20
EOF

cat numbers | ruby -ane 'BEGIN { $t=0}; END {puts $t}; $t += $_.to_i'

note how the BEGIN zeros out the global, and the END prints the result.

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