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tldr: I want zsh to ignore rvm reporting system ruby and only display it when rvm is actually being used.

I've been using zsh with the terrific oh-my-zsh extensions for some time now. It's got my prompt looking like this, with the gnzh theme included with oh-my-zsh:

╭─emergent@elysian ~/devel/octopress ‹ruby-1.9.3› ‹source*› 
╰─➤ 

Note the ‹ruby-1.9.3› ‹source*› -- that of course is the zsh theme doing some things in order to sort me out with the version that rvm is using as well as the current branch of the git repo.

I've also been playing around with getting this to work with python's virtualenv using the virtualenvwrapper plugin, as well as a few tweaks within virtualenvwrapper itself in order to avoid it simply prepending (virtualenv) at the start of my $PROMPT.

I like this because it only shows an indication when I've changed my directory into a virtualenv and activated it (which virtualenvwrapper/zsh automagically does for me). However, this doesn't work well when I shift things into a virtualenv and the path names start getting longer. For example:

╭─emergent@elysian ~PROJECT_HOME/djangotutorial/mysite/polls ‹djangotutorial› ‹system› ‹tu
torial02*›
╰─➤

My terminal is only 88 characters wide, and as such, my prompt theme (including virtualenvwrapper, rvm and git information) is being spread over 3 lines.

The solution I've been trying is to only display an rvm indicator when I've actually got an rvm ruby activated. I don't find myself ever using the two at the same time, and having ‹system› appended to each one of my prompt lines seems ultimately superfluous.

This is what I've tried amending my .zsh-theme in order to achieve this:

local rvm_ruby=''
# Tests for existence of RVM
if which rvm-prompt &> /dev/null; then
  # !!! THIS IS THE EDIT TO THE THEME I'M ATTEMPTING: !!!
  # Tests if it's using the system ruby and only displays when RVM is
  # actually being used.
  if [ $(rvm-prompt i v g s) != "system" ]; then
    rvm_ruby='%{$PR_RED%}‹$(rvm-prompt i v g s)›%{$PR_NO_COLOR%}'
  fi
else
  if which rbenv &> /dev/null; then
    rvm_ruby='%{$PR_RED%}‹$(rbenv version | sed -e "s/ (set.*$//")›%{$PR_NO_COLOR%}'
  fi
fi
local git_branch='$(git_prompt_info)%{$PR_NO_COLOR%}'

#PROMPT="${user_host} ${current_dir} ${rvm_ruby} ${git_branch}$PR_PROMPT "
PROMPT="╭─${user_host} ${current_dir} ${rvm_ruby} ${git_branch}
╰─$PR_PROMPT "

However, it doesn't do anything at all --- I can't see any difference before and after this edit. I've ensured that I am sourceing ~/.zshrc. I tested the conditional evaluation in a smaller script, and it seemed to work out:

if [ $(rvm-prompt i v g s) != "system" ]; then
  echo $(rvm-prompt i v g s)
fi

╭─emergent@elysian ~/devel/shellscripts ‹system› 
╰─➤  ./test.sh
╭─emergent@elysian ~/devel/shellscripts ‹system› 
╰─➤  rvm use ruby-1.9.3
Using /home/emergent/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p392
╭─emergent@elysian ~/devel/shellscripts ‹ruby-1.9.3› 
╰─➤  ./test.sh         
ruby-1.9.3

Anyone who's more experienced with messing about with shell stuff have any ideas as to what I might be able to do better here? Even if your suggestion is to tell me to do something totally different from what I'm up to now in the interest of increased utility and productivity, I'm down to hear it. Cheers and thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
+1 for the arrows –  louism Mar 10 '13 at 19:46
    
The arrow as you're seeing it there is what came with oh-my-zsh, although that's just what the terminal looks like on my linux box. On OSX I've got it looking more like this, because the terminal on OSX seems to pull off unicode a bit better. Imagine a newline after the ~ : @Ds-MacBook.local ~ ⤷ –  Dmitri DB Mar 10 '13 at 19:50
    
I suggest a TL;DR for your question if you want it to get answered. –  louism Mar 11 '13 at 2:06
    
Thanks for the suggestion, I understand that it wasn't exactly the most concise explanation for what I had to say. –  Dmitri DB Mar 11 '13 at 3:57
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've got this:

if which rvm-prompt &> /dev/null; then
  if [ $(rvm-prompt i v g s) != "system" ]; then
    rvm_ruby='%{$PR_RED%}‹$(rvm-prompt i v g s)›%{$PR_NO_COLOR%}'
  fi
else
  # We don't have `rvm-prompt`, try using `rbenv` instead.
fi

Let's have a look at what this is actually doing. When you open a new terminal, zsh loads a bunch of files, including ~/.zshrc. In your ~/.zshrc, you're sourceing the theme. Thus, as zsh loads, it runs through the edit you've made.

The first thing it'll check is whether or not it can find rvm-prompt using the zsh [builtin] which. It does this by checking the return code of which (if 0, continue). (Not finding rvm-prompt is a different issue, and not really related to this answer).

If we do find rvm-prompt, using your edit we then examine whether or not the output of rvm-prompt i v g s is system. It's not, so we set $rvm_ruby to contain a call to rvm-prompt.

Then, zsh continues loading the theme, finally finishing and setting $PROMPT to a bunch of stuff, including a call to rvm-prompt. It's very useful to remember that zsh does not re-examine the theme logic! (That's why we need to source ~/path/to/theme after editing it)!

So what's the problem? If rvm-prompt does not say system on shell startup, we use output from rvm-prompt for the remainder of the session in our prompt. (If rvm-prompt was system, we wouldn't display any rvm indicator in our prompt... because rvm_ruby is left blank!).

Now that we understand what's happening, we can work on fixing it. There are two approaches I can think of.

1. Strip the word system out of the prompt:

if which rvm-prompt &> /dev/null; then
  rvm_ruby='%{$PR_RED%}‹$(rvm-prompt i v g s | sed -e "s/system//")›%{$PR_NO_COLOR%}'
else
  # We don't have `rvm-prompt`, try using `rbenv` instead.
fi

This works, but will display a (red) <> in your prompt when rvm-prompt is system:

╭─@charmander.local ~ ‹ruby-1.9.3›
╰─ rvm default
╭─@charmander.local ~ ‹ruby-1.9.3›
╰─ rvm use system
Now using system ruby.
╭─@charmander.local ~ ‹›
╰─

You might find this useful. I think it would annoy me.

2. Use a smarter $PROMPT: write a function.

In your theme:

function current_rvm() {
  if which rvm-prompt &> /dev/null; then
    if [ $(rvm-prompt i v g s) != "system" ]; then
      # The double quotes make it work, single quotes do not work.
      echo "%{$PR_RED%}‹$(rvm-prompt i v g s)›%{$PR_NO_COLOR%}"
    else
      # `rvm-prompt` is `system`
      echo ''
    fi
  else
    # We don't have `rvm-prompt`, try using `rbenv` instead.
  fi
}
local rvm_ruby='$(current_rvm)'

This should work happily for you:

╭─@charmander.local ~ ‹ruby-1.9.3›
╰─ rvm use system
Now using system ruby.
╭─@charmander.local ~
╰─ rvm use default
Using /Users/simont/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.3-p362
╭─@charmander.local ~ ‹ruby-1.9.3›
╰─
share|improve this answer
    
Right on! I had been mucking about with some sort of function and didn't get anywhere with it, but had a good idea that it was the right way to go. Thanks for coming up with a solution :) –  Dmitri DB Mar 11 '13 at 18:36
1  
I've added a small edit -- On the echo return from current_rvm(), if it's not encapsulated in double quotes it'll give me a prompt that looks like emergent@elysian ~/devel/octopress $PR_RED‹$(rvm-prompt i v g s)›$PR_NO_COLOR ‹source› . Changing the echo statement's quotations does the trick to make things work. –  Dmitri DB Mar 11 '13 at 19:07
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