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this might be a newbie question and I see something similar asked before, but I hope someone will help me. Below is a small (hopefully) illustrative code. I want to have two functions share some code. They will both have a test, which boils down to: if (int operator int). It should be possible to describe the operator with a pointer, and then use what the pointer points to in the test, shouldnt it?

func1(){
  func3(1)
}

func2(){
  func3(2);
}

func3(int type){
  char *op;
  int value1;
  int value2;
  switch (type){
  case 1:
        op = ">";
        value1 = 1;
        value2 = 3;
        break;
  case 2: 
       op = "=";
       value1 = 2;
       value2 = 5;
       break; 
 }
 if (value1 *op value2){
     do something
 }
}

I find that > is converted to 62 (decimal) in a text to binary calculator, but this prints out 60 - why?

char *p = "<";
printf("%d\n", *p);
share|improve this question
    
Read about the function qsort(). It sorta works like you want, by passing the pointer to a function. –  pmg Mar 10 '13 at 19:47
    
Or slightly more generally: get a good C book and read about function pointers. –  Philip Kendall Mar 10 '13 at 19:51
    
@kendall. I have a great book on C (by kernighan &Ritchie). I still find it very helpful to ask questions here on stackoverflow - not necessarily because I am too lazy to read the book, but I most often gain insight into something I thought I knew...other times my code is bad and I should feel bad.... –  hotGopher Mar 10 '13 at 20:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You cannot do it exactly as you wrote it. But it should be doable with function pointers. Here is one way you might be able to do it:

func1(){
  func3(1)
}

func2(){
  func3(2);
}
typedef (int *myOperator)(int, int);
int operatorGt(int a, int b) {
  return a > b;
}

int operatorEq(int a, int b) {
  return a = b;
}


func3(int type){
  myOperator op = NULL;
  int value1;
  int value2;
  switch (type){
  case 1:
        op = &operatorGt;
        value1 = 1;
        value2 = 3;
        break;
  case 2: 
       op = &operatorEq;
       value1 = 2;
       value2 = 5;
       break; 
 }
 if (NULL != op && op(value1, value2)){
     do something
 }
}

I'm not giving any guarantees that this will compile or work - but the method is more likely to work. I have not compiled it - so there might be some compiler errors and/or warnings to fix for you. Wouldn't want to make it too easy :D

share|improve this answer
    
I will soon look at it. It kind of hit me on the bus what an operator is, and why my code was wrong. Nice code example (although I havent started testing it yet...) –  hotGopher Mar 10 '13 at 20:40
    
This code is not valid C, it's C++. –  user4815162342 Mar 10 '13 at 20:51
    
@fredrik. I assume that it should be (if(op != NULL....etc.). –  hotGopher Mar 10 '13 at 20:58
    
@user4815162342 That is true, so accessing the language built-in operators might not be possible - then one would have to define custom functions which are wrappers for the build-int ones. –  fredrik Mar 10 '13 at 21:01
    
@dexter No, I meant it the way I wrote it. That way if you forget a ! or = you would get a compiler error since you try to reassign null... –  fredrik Mar 10 '13 at 21:02

It should be possible to describe the operator with a pointer, and then use what the pointer points to in the test, shouldnt it?

No am afraid , it's not possible to reference/dereference an operator using a pointer , because an operator is entirely different from a datatype.

share|improve this answer

You actually want to be working with function pointers ... you can't simply use a char to become a function because the char value is equivalent to the token of an operator. Token substitution like you're attempting can only be done with the pre-processor.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. This was helpful. I hope I didnt rob you of the accepted answer (based on time). –  hotGopher Mar 10 '13 at 20:39
    
Don't worry, you're fine :-) –  Jason Mar 10 '13 at 20:59

As others said, you cannot take the address of a C operator directly, but you can take the address of a function that only serves to use the operator. Since the number of operators is limited, you can — sort-of — convert an operator to a pointer like this:

#define DECLARE_OPFN(name, operator) bool op_##name(int op1, int op2) { \
  return op1 operator op2; \
}

DECLARE_OPFN(lt, <)
DECLARE_OPFN(le, <=)
DECLARE_OPFN(gt, >)
DECLARE_OPFN(ge, >=)
DECLARE_OPFN(eq, ==)
DECLARE_OPFN(ne, !=)

typedef bool (*opfn_type)(int, int);

opfn_type get_opfn(char *op)
{
  static const struct {
    const char *str;
    bool (*op)(int, int);
  } all_ops[]  = { {"<", op_lt}, {"<=", op_le}, {">", op_gt}, {">=", op_ge},
                   {"==", op_eq}, {"!=", op_ne} };
  int i;
  for (i = 0; all_ops[i].str; i++)
    if (!strcmp(op, all_ops[i].str))
      return all_ops[i].op;
  return NULL;
}

// ...
get_opfn(my_op_str)(val1, val2);
share|improve this answer
    
Assign a string to the operator a few lines before, then search a map for the string? This is C. Use enum and directly index the array. –  Shahbaz Mar 10 '13 at 22:01
    
@Shahbaz I assumed the operator was coming from an external source only available at run-time, such as file contents or prompting the user. But this is in fact not mentioned in the question, so the enum would be more appropriate. Still, the code is instructive as written because this pattern is fairly common. –  user4815162342 Mar 10 '13 at 22:14

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