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I am not a fan of copy construction. Too many times, I've written

void MyFunc(MyClass val)

instead of

void MyFunc(const MyClass& val)

and had to spend hours debugging bugs around pointers having been deleted in the passed-by-value clone's destructor, or discovering slowdown because I'm copying every member of MyClass every time I call MyFunc.

So I don't want to allow copy constructors.

I know you can ban them on a per-class basis with

private:
    MyClass(const MyClass&)

But I don't want to have to do that on every single class.

Is there a compiler switch to turn off copy construction by default? Is there a reason I should allow copy construction on anything other than built-in types and pointers? (These same questions apply to copy assignment, too)

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std::vector<MyClass>. Can you use that without copy construction(nor move construction)? –  mfontanini Mar 10 '13 at 20:23
1  
"Is there a reason I should allow copy construction...?" Yes, so you can copy construct and copy assign objects. It turns out this is quite useful. –  juanchopanza Mar 10 '13 at 20:23
1  
In C++11 you could also say MyClass(MyClass const&) = delete;. –  bitmask Mar 10 '13 at 20:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Is there a compiler switch to turn off copy construction by default?

No, and I really I hope there isn't. Fortunately, to the best of my knowledge, that's indeed the case.

Is there a reason I should allow copy construction on anything other than built-in types and pointers?

Sure. For instance, to give your types value semantics and treat different instances of your class as the same conceptual entity. And in that case, creating copies turns out to be quite a handy thing.

If you want to have a non-copyable class, on the other hand (there are use cases for this), you can declare the copy-constructor as private (as you yourself suggested) or, in C++11, mark it as deleted:

struct X
{
    X(X const&) = delete;
};

Concerning what you write:

Too many times, I've written void MyFunc(MyClass val) instead of void MyFunc(const MyClass& val) and had to spend hours debugging bugs

I understand that you may make mistakes, but you have to learn from them. You could also write an ordinary function such as foo() below:

void foo(int x) { x++; }

And swear for hours trying to figure out why, when you pass it as an argument a variable whose value is 3, the value of that variable after the call returns is not 4. Oh, you forgot to add the reference symbol:

void foo(int& x) { x++; }
//          ^

Now is this a reason for desiring a compiler option that would make pass-by-reference the default? Not really. That would be an option to change the language rules.

Imagine would would happen if your compiler really had such a switch you are wishing for, and one day you would send your program to someone else who is not using that switch: how many hours would they spend debugging it to find out where the problem is?

My advice is to learn from experience and try to adapt your reading and writing skills to the Standard language, rather than vice versa.

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I appreciate the answer. You make a good point about a real-life compiler switch being a bad idea, so I suppose this question is only academic, but -- copy constructors still should be something you have to opt-in to (by specifically declaring them public in your class header), rather than opt-out of. They're obviously useful if you want a copy of a class whose data you can muck around with and destroy, but pass-by-ref / pass-by-const-ref seems less bug-prone, more performant, and easier to understand. –  Ben Walker Mar 10 '13 at 20:44
1  
@BenWalker: Mine was just an analogy. Maybe the pass-by-ref vs pass-by-value wasn't the best example, but copy construction is really something that most of the time you want rather than not. Value semantics is very important. Not having a copy constructor would force you to pass-by-reference every time. Standard containers don't work that way. But even supposing (purely by imagination) that suppressing copy constructors by default was something desirable, this change would introduce huge problems with backwards compatibility, breaking billions of existing programs. –  Andy Prowl Mar 10 '13 at 20:48

There is no magical switch. You just make programming mistakes and want the language to change. If you allocate memory on heap, you have to (or at least should) override the default copy constructor and take care of that dynamic memory. Alternatively you can use some ready classes like std::vector or std::auto_ptr (std::unique_ptr in C++11).

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What I do is declare the copy ctor in the class but never define it anywhere. If I write code that uses the copy ctor, then I get an undefined symbol from the linker.

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2  
If you declare the copy constructor private, as OP mentions in the question, you get a compilation error, which is even better. –  juanchopanza Mar 10 '13 at 20:35
1  
Also, I'm not sure this would work if your compiler elides the call to the copy constructor –  Andy Prowl Mar 10 '13 at 20:36

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