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We know that the easy way to find the smallest number of a list would simply be n comparisons, and if we wanted the 2nd smallest number we could go through it again or just keep track of another variable during the first iteration. Either way, this would take 2n comparisons to find both numbers.

So suppose that I had a list of n distinct elements, and I wanted to find the smallest and the 2nd smallest. Yes, the optimal algorithm takes at most n + ceiling(lg n) - 2 comparisons. (Not interested in the optimal way though)

But suppose then that you're forced to use the easy algorithm, the one that takes 2n comparisons. In the worst case, it'd take 2n comparisons. But what about the average? What would be the average number of comparisons it'd take to find the smallest and the 2nd smallest using the easy brute force algorithm?

EDIT: It'd have to be smaller than 2n -- (copied and pasted from my comment below) I compare the index I am at to the tmp2 variable keeping track of 2nd smallest. I don't need to make another comparison to tmp1 variable keeping track of smallest unless the value at my current index is smaller than tmp2. So you can reduce the number of comparisons from 2n. It'd still take more than n though. Yes in worst case this would still take 2n comparisons. But on average if everything is randomly put in...

I'd guess that it'd be n + something comparisons, but I can't figure out the 2nd part. I'd imagine that there would be some way to involve log n somehow, but any ideas on how to prove that?

(Coworker asked me this at lunch, and I got stumped. Sorry) Once again, I'm not interested in the optimal algorithm since that one is kinda common knowledge.

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Doesn't it take 2n (or 2n - 1, if you remove the largest after it is found) in all cases? Just like you need to scan the entire list to ensure that you've found the largest, you need to scan the entire list to ensure that you've found the second largest. There is no "average number of comparisons" that's any different from the maximum. –  Ted Hopp Mar 10 '13 at 20:49
    
I don't think so -- so let's think of it this way. I compare the index I am at to the tmp2 variable keeping track of 2nd smallest. I don't need to make another comparison to tmp1 variable keeping track of smallest unless the value at my current index is smaller than tmp2. So you can reduce the number of comparisons from 2n. It'd still take more than n though. Yes in worst case this would still take 2n comparisons. But on average if everything is randomly put in... that's where I'm stuck. –  user2154689 Mar 10 '13 at 20:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you pointed out in the comment, there is no need for a second comparison if the current element in the iteration is larger than the second smallest found so far. What is the probability for a second comparison if we look at the k-th element ?

I think this can be rephrased as follows "What is the probability that the k-th element is in the subset containing the 2 smallest elements of the first k elements?" This should be 2/k for uniformly distributed elements, because if we think of the first k elements as an ordered list, every position has equal probability 1/k for the k-th element, but only two, the smallest and second smallest position, cause a second comparison. So the number of 2nd comparisons should be sum_k=1^n (2/k) = 2 H_n (the n-th harmonic number). This is actually the calculation of the expected value for second comparisons, where the random number represents the event that a second comparison has to be done, it is 1 if a second comparison has to be done and 0 if just one comparison has to be done.

If this is correct, the overall number of comparisons in the average case is C(n) = n + 2 H_n and afaik H_n = theta(log(n)), C(n) = theta(n + log(n)) = theta(n)

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Thanks for the answer. I'm not sure I completely understand your answer though -- I haven't dealt with probability and harmonic numbers since... freshman year in college? (wow that's been a long time) Could you clarify? –  user2154689 Mar 10 '13 at 21:43
    
So for example I understand that you should sum up the probabilities for all k in 1...n. So I see where the harmonic numbers come from. But why 2/k instead of 1/k? If we're just asking for the kth element, shouldn't it be 1/k? –  user2154689 Mar 10 '13 at 21:50
    
I think it should be 2/k, because the k-th element can either be the smallest or the second smallest element, both cases would cause a second comparison. I just referred to harmonic numbers because I remembered from analysis of algorithms that it is theta(log(n)). –  Boris Mar 10 '13 at 22:00
    
Ah, that makes sense. Thanks for the explanation. –  user2154689 Mar 10 '13 at 22:08
    
Notice that Theta(n + log n) = Theta(n). –  G. Bach Mar 11 '13 at 0:44

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