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Why would you ever want to use a generic method in c# without at least putting some constraints on the parameters? I can't really think of a method that does anything useful that can be passed ANY type.

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Ever hear of List<T>? –  ChaosPandion Mar 10 '13 at 21:05
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How about a dictionary? –  bas Mar 10 '13 at 21:05
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Those are generic classes, not methods. –  SLaks Mar 10 '13 at 21:05
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@ChaosPandion: It's a class which is generic in the type. There's a big difference between a generic class and a generic type. Enumerable is a non-generic type with generic methods. List<T> is a generic type with methods which are mostly non-generic. If you were to treat that as a non-generic type with the T provided on every method call, it wouldn't be safe: List list = new List(); list.Add<int>(10); string x = list.Item<string>(0); (Imagine a method called Item, instead of an indexer - the fact that there are no generic properties or indexers is another problem with that POV.) –  Jon Skeet Mar 10 '13 at 21:08
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An even better question is: under what circumstances do you need a generic method to be constrained? That is, if you have Foo<T>(T thing) where T : IBar then why did you not just say Foo(IBar thing) ? –  Eric Lippert Mar 10 '13 at 21:51
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A simple example:

void Swap<T>(ref T a, ref T b)
{
    T temp = a;
    a = b;
    b = temp;
}

Don't forget that every type T derives from System.Object an therefore inherits a couple of useful methods. Well, strictly spoken not every type. Interfaces, for instance, do not inherit from object but types implementing them do. So, even if T is an interface type, C# allows you to access members inherited from object.

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Ah. This makes sense. Sweet! –  rage Mar 10 '13 at 21:10
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Whenever you have a use for it, e.g. IEnumerable<T> extension methods.

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Also System.Linq.Enumerable (non-generic static class) has a couple of generic methods that are not extension methods, like Enumerable.Range, Enumerable.Repeat, Enumerable.Empty. Just to give an example where it's not an extension of a generic type (like extensions of IEnumerable<T>). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Mar 10 '13 at 21:30
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When you need the method to be ... Generic.

I have an example I posted in another answer. It is a method called ExecuteTimedAction. It takes an action, a couple of parameters, times the action, executes it, and returns the result. It's used in a common library for anything I need to log the execution time of.

This method doesn't care about the type T. It just executes another method (delegate) and returns whatever type is the return type of that method. No need for constraints because there is no dependency within the method that requires a constraint.

I think this is a good candidate, And certainly not the only example but one that was at the top of my head. Here's the method, from this answer:

    /// <summary>
    /// Generic method for performing an operation and tracking the time it takes to complete (returns a value)
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Generic parameter which can be any Type</typeparam>
    /// <param name="actionText">Title for the log entry</param>
    /// <param name="func">The action (delegate method) to execute</param>
    /// <returns>The generic Type returned from the operation's execution</returns>

    public static T ExecuteTimedAction<T>(string actionText, Func<T> executeFunc, Action<string> logAction)
    {
        string beginText = string.Format("Begin Execute Timed Action: {0}", actionText);

        if (null != logAction)
        {
            logAction(beginText);
        }
        else
        {
            LogUtil.Log(beginText);
        }

        Stopwatch stopWatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        T t = executeFunc(); // Execute the action
        stopWatch.Stop();

        string endText = string.Format("End Execute Timed Action: {0}", actionText);
        string durationText = string.Format("Total Execution Time (for {0}): {1}", actionText, stopWatch.Elapsed);

        if (null != logAction)
        {
            logAction(endText);
            logAction(durationText);                
        }
        else
        {
            LogUtil.Log(endText);
            LogUtil.Log(durationText);
        }

        return t;
    }
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