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I want to be able to read the following:

myvar = { 1 2 3 5 }

So what I've done is

string input;
int intInput;

cin >> input; //take in the varname, do stuff
cin >> input; // check to make sure it's "="
if (input != "=") {
    //stuff
}

cin >> input; //check to make sure it's "{"
if (input != "{") {
    //stuff
}

while (cin >> intInput) {
   //stuff
   cout << intInput << endl;
}

At this point, my understanding is that the "}" char has been stored into intInput, which ends the while loop. I want to make sure that it ends with "}".

c.unget();
cin >> input;
if (input != "}") {
    //stuff
} 

I thought that the c.unget(); will give me the last character, which is "}" in this case, but input is still "{" when I cout the value of input.

How do I make sure that the set ends with a "}" char?

share|improve this question
    
cin.unget(); will put the previous input back into the input stream. Try removing that line to see what happens. – Code-Apprentice Mar 10 '13 at 21:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you cout input you're going to get a "{" because it was the last string it read here:

cin >> input; //check to make sure it's "{"

Then you are putting your digits into intInput. You could instead read your input with your string the entire time, and convert it to an integer if it does not equal "}"

#include <cstdlib>
while (cin >> input) {
    if(input == "}")
        break;
    else
       intInput = atoi(input.c_str()); //or whatever means you prefer to convert a string to int
    cout << intInput << endl;
}

If a "}" is read, it breaks out of your loop.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks correct, but what if I want to check if the input is an int? Do I call a typeid(input).class() and check what type of class it is? – averageUsername123 Mar 10 '13 at 22:03
1  
@aaronjylee The most straightforward way is probably to iterate through your string one character at a time and use <ccytpe>'s isdigit() method. If you find a character that is not a digit, then your string is not an integer. – Memento Mori Mar 10 '13 at 22:06
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
using namespace std;
int main() {
    string name, buf;
    cin >> name;
    cin >> buf; // =
    cin >> buf; // {
    while(1) {
        if(cin >> buf) {
            if(buf == "}") break;
            stringstream ss(buf);
            int i;
            ss >> i;
            if(ss.fail()) {
                cout << "fail" << endl;
                            //conversion error
            } else {
                cout << i << endl;
            }
        } else {
            cout << "no }" << endl;
                    break;
            //only if cin is reading from file, or wating for CTRL+D from terminal emulator
        }

    }

}
share|improve this answer

Check this out:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int i;
    string input;
    while (cin >> input)
    {
        if (input == "}")
            break;
        else
            stringstream(input) >> i;

        cout << i << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I'd read to std::string and check it is a digit or a "}" symbol

while (cin >> stringInput) {
    if (stringInput = "}") {
        break;
    }
    if (sscanf(stringInput.c_str(), "%d", &intInput) == 0) {
         //stuff
    }
}

It could be better to use/write a lexer though

share|improve this answer

The Buffer will still contain the characters the user entered if it wasn't a number. It will just set the fail flag. Just read again as string then:

string input;
int intInput;

cin >> input; //take in the varname, do stuff
cin >> input; // check to make sure it's "="
if (input != "=") {
    //stuff
}

cin >> input; //check to make sure it's "{"
if (input != "{") {
    //stuff
}

do {
   cin >> int;
   if (!cin) {
       cin.clear();    // clear error flags
       cin >> input;   // read again as string
       if (input != "}") {
           // handle error
       }
   }
   else
       cout << intInput << endl;
} while (input != "}");
share|improve this answer

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